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After many years at the margins of historical investigation, the late medieval English gentry are widely regarded as an important and worthy subject for academic research. This book aims to explore the culture of the wide range of people whom we might include within the late medieval gentry, taking in all of landed society below the peerage, from knights down to gentlemen, and including those aspirants to gentility who might under traditional socio-economic terms be excluded from the group. It begins by exploring the origins of, and influences on, the culture of the late medieval gentry, thus contributing to the ongoing debate on defining the membership of this group. The book considers the gentry's emergence as a group distinct from the nobility, and looks at the various available routes to gentility. Through surveys of the gentry's military background, administrative and political roles, social behaviour, and education, it seeks to provide an overview of how the group's culture evolved, and how it was disseminated. The book offers a broad view of late medieval gentry culture, which explores, reassesses and indeed sometimes even challenges the idea that members of the gentry cultivated their own distinctive cultural identity. The evolution of the gentleman as a peer-assessed phenomenon, gentlemanly behaviour within the chivalric tradition, the education received by gentle children, and the surviving gentry correspondence are also discussed. Although the Church had an ambivalent attitude toward artistic expression, much of the gentry's involvement with the visual arts was religious in focus.

Textual representations
Editor: Angela K. Smith

The changes in warfare during the twentieth century could be addressed from a variety of perspectives, political, cultural, and national. This book addresses the issue of how gender is constructed by exploring a range of historical events. It also asserts that a focus on gender, rather than producing a depoliticised reading of our culture, offers an informed debate on a range of political issues. The book explores the impact of warfare on women whose civilian or quasi-military roles resulted in their exile or self-exile to the role of 'other'. The book first draws upon a number of genres to use Richard Aldington and H. D. (the poet Hilda Doolittle), to understand the social and cultural implications of warfare for both parties in a relationship. Then, it examines the intricate gender assumptions that surround the condition of 'shell shock' through a detailed exploration of the life and work of Ver a Brittain. Continuing this theme, considering the nature of warfare, the gendered experience of warfare, through the lens of the home front, the book discusses the gendered attitudes to the First World War located within Aldous Huxley's novella 'Farcical History of Richard Greenow'. Wars represented in Western cinema are almost universally gendered as male, which corresponds to the battlefield history of twentieth-century warfare. As this situation changes, and more women join the armed services, especially in the United States, a more inclusive cinematic coding evolves through struggle. The book considers three decades of film, from the Vietnam War to the present.

Annalisa Oboe and Elisa Bordin

constitutes the basic storyline of the text which, however, presents a highly fragmented non-linear structure, in tune with the fragmentation caused by the explosion of the landmine and its severe impact on the memory of the concussed child leader of the military unit. The first narrative line is frequently interrupted by flashbacks referring to the character’s childhood before the onset of hostilities and in the early stages of the war, and it is in these temporal digressions, which disclose My Luck’s personal experiences and

in Chris Abani
Abstract only
Towards ‘Conclusions’
John Kinsella

sequelae to the damage through justice, repair, restoration and knowledge. Poetry, in this capacity, as integral to all forms of existence. Poetry free from categorisation outside that of responsibility, of embodying intactness. No nation-state (but, rather, communities), and no-self, just collaboration towards languages that people need and respect: this, rather than those languages and narratives forced upon us all as extensions of capital-military-state control. *** ‘i’ suggest that we start from a position wherein the

in Beyond Ambiguity
The Secret History of Las Vegas
Annalisa Oboe and Elisa Bordin

‘sin city’, is where the two countries’ immoralities converge. The title of this chapter indicates that violence is again a starting point for my analysis. ‘State’, intentionally in quotation marks, refers to two different aspects of violence. ‘State’ may refer to the American and South African nation-states, depicted in the book as the perpetrators of institutional violence – a theme Abani introduced in GraceLand , with Elvis being unjustly incarcerated and tortured by a corrupt military body. In The

in Chris Abani
Susan Maddock

A Geoffrey Sutton, esquire, is also recorded in commercial contexts in London in 1429 and in Wisbech in 1433. 36 A man who had done military service under a noble commander and had mercantile interests might well seek in marriage a wealthy widow in a well-connected merchant family. Isabel's status as John de Brunham's widow remained stronger in the public consciousness than her new one as an esquire's wife, however, as appears from her continued identification in records at Lynn as ‘Isabel Brunham’, rather than as

in Encountering The Book of Margery Kempe
John Kinsella

listen to the spirit of a people who have experienced and continue to experience some of the worst human rights abuses, but who, even under extreme duress and the constant reality of violence from the Myanmar state, know the spirit and intactness of their voice, their right to be a people and to live in the land that is their home. The suppression of the Rohingya by the machinery of British colonialism, then the military dictatorship, and the failure of post-dictatorship government to arrest the attack on the

in Beyond Ambiguity
Abstract only
John Kinsella

that can bring new life, and fire that feeds on fire, that doesn’t cancel out. But extreme ongoing out of control fire events that are increasing to the point of total incineration? Authorities and privateers (especially farmers) burn when they can and authorities increasingly burn all year round – officially induced, accidental, acts of stupidity, and climate-shift enhanced. So many major fires (New South Wales last year, Sunshine Coast this year) were caused by military training activities! Some years ago – maybe 2012 – while we

in Beyond Ambiguity
Abstract only
John Kinsella

it could be argued that all killing must be stopped immediately or we simply appease our own consciences at the expense of being concerned about our own behaviours – many mass murders have taken place as people let their nation’s military go about its business outside their personal scrutiny, as that scrutiny is confronting to undertake. Ethical positions are not ‘cults’; cults are the control of others to remove their capacity for personal choice – but it is a paradox to see veganism called a cult by meat

in Beyond Ambiguity
Annalisa Oboe and Elisa Bordin

of military dictatorships: in 1991, ‘alone, and with nothing’, he managed to escape to London. 3 This reference to some of the most challenging moments in Abani’s life, at the outset of this book, wishes to highlight the entanglement between life and literary work that this chapter intends to analyse, and to anticipate that no attempt is made in this volume to provide a full picture of the life and times of Chris Abani. Our aim in what follows is rather to offer a fresh overview of the substantial literary production of a

in Chris Abani