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David R. Wilson

‘curios’ at the Mission House in 1897, which advertised the collection and explained its rationale.88 Mary Tooth (1777–1843), who lived with Mary Fletcher from the mid-­1790s, was until her death guardian of the reliquary that comprised the Madeley vicarage, church, and churchyard. Benjamin Gregory recorded that on his visit she ‘seemed proud to show me all the Fletcheriana: the lanthorn which he used in his night-­visits to the sick, a curious piece of Continental mechanism, etc’.89 It was the holiness of the Fletchers that drew the revivalist preacher and founder of

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain
Jennifer Lloyd

with him to Chao Tung. Samuel Pollard, later the Bible Christian mission’s superintendent, described her dedication to the cause, indicating women’s value in attracting potential converts: Mrs. Thorne was the pioneer of our womens [sic] work in this city. Her tall figure and the unusual sight of her ‘big’ feet contrasting so startlingly with the tiny mutilated lilly [sic] feet of the Chaotung women drew crowds of the latter to the mission house … She cared little for the luxuries of home life. Her whoul [sic] soul was bent on her business. She spoke Chinese as

in Women and the shaping of British Methodism
David Hardiman

children. This was carried out either on the veranda of the mission house or in the homes of the local people, and it was seen as an extension of domestic work. 1 Attempts by single women to gain support from the missionary societies to be sent as missionaries were in almost all cases blocked. 2 This situation changed in the second half of the nineteenth century as women began to assert the central role of

in Missionaries and their medicine
David Hardiman

–9. 46 ‘Address by the Rev. P. H. Johnson (Bhil Mission)’, Church Mission House, Salisbury Square, London, 1953, Paul Johnson papers. 47 Malaviya, ‘Anglican Contributions’, pp. 71 and 80. 48 ‘The Ven. P. H. Johnson Writes

in Missionaries and their medicine
Andrew J. May

, their contents will have rotted. Since the rains began even the clothes that we are wearing have begun to rot’. 2 On 6 August Jones secured one of two houses that were on sale on the military station, and on 6 September moved into the first mission house at Cherrapunji; he grandly reported to Roberts that on this red-letter day, after so much wandering, they had ‘taken

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Abstract only
Second-generation missionaries
Emily J. Manktelow

Another controversy over his education soon ensued, however. In 1856 he applied to the Directors to be allowed an additional twelve months in England in order to pursue medical studies, at personal expense. His request was denied. In the summer of that year, however, having three months of vacation in front of him, he again went to the Mission House in order to apply to pursue medical studies during that time. The LMS’s physician, Dr Risdon Bennett (whose daughter was later to head the female missionary board) informed him that

in Missionary families
Andrew J. May

just as importantly from Catholicism. Tomlin stayed in the Khasi Hills for about nine months. His wife was very ill during the rainy months through to September, after their son was born on 15 June 1837 at the Mission House at Cherrapunji (and named Joshua Cherra, commemorating both the place and the last of the original Serampore trio). 41 Tomlin and Lish had both left the

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Andrew J. May

mission house back to the Inglis family for 500 rupees in August 1849, and by 1850 Pryse had established a new mission station on the plains at Sylhet, leaving William and Mary Lewis again labouring alone in the hills. Their operations at Cherrapunji, Mawsmai and Mawmluh were augmented in 1851 with a new schoolhouse at Shella, a large village to the south-west of Cherrapunji, where a new church

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
David Hardiman

on medical work. In the words of the political agent: As previously arranged the Rev. Mr. Thompson came there [Lusadiya] as soon as the season opened at the latter end of October, and pitching his tent near the site he had selected for the school and the mission houses began operations by opening a

in Missionaries and their medicine
Andrew J. May

in quietly to see her’. Ann was buried on a small hill near the mission house; ‘there I hope’, wrote Jones, ‘that my own body will be laid to rest when I depart from it’. Ann died at half past two in the afternoon. By five O’clock, a large number of Khasis had gathered at the station, and the missionaries took the opportunity to address them in the

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism