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Methodist missionaries in colonial and postcolonial Upper Burma, 1887–1966

The first British Methodist missionaries came to Upper Burma in 1887 and the last left in 1966. They were known as 'Wesleyans' before 1932 and afterwards as 'Methodists'. This book is a study of the ambitions, activities and achievements of Methodist missionaries in northern Burma from 1887-1966 and the expulsion of the last missionaries by Ne Win. Henry Venn, the impeccably evangelical Secretary of the Church Missionary Society (CMS), was the most distinguished and inspiring of nineteenth-century mission administrators. Wesleyan missionaries often found property development more congenial than saving souls. In Pakokku in December 1905, a 'weak' American missionary from Myingyan and a couple of Baptist Burman government officials began 'totally immersing' Wesleyans. Proselytism was officially frowned upon in the Indian Empire. The Wesley high schools were extraordinarily successful during the early years of the twentieth century. The Colonial Government was investing heavily in education. A bamboo curtain descended on Upper Burma in May 1942. Wesley Church Mandalay was gutted during the bombing raids of April 1942 and the Japanese requisitioned the Mission House and the Girls High School soon afterwards. General Ne Win was ruthlessly radical in 1962. By April 1964 Bishop was the last 'front-line' Methodist missionary in Upper Burma and the last European of any sort in Monywa. The book pulls together the themes of conflict, politics and proselytisation in to a fascinating study of great breadth.

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Michael D. Leigh

executions took place. He had bouts of fever, and an officious High-Church District Commissioner tried to fob him off with a site out of town. He held out and acquired 4 1\2 acres in the town centre for the bargain price of 400 rupees. 33 It provided space enough to build a mission house, church and at least one school. Bestall was a chip off the Winston block and it was not long before the Missionary Committee detected the tell-tale warning signs. Bestall slipped into the role of ‘wheeler and dealer’ on the edge of empire. It was the

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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1 The National Archives, UK (TNA), Colonial Office (CO) 318 Colonial Office and Predecessors: West Indies Original Correspondence/118 West India Miscellaneous 1834, vol. 1, Public Office, Jabez Bunting (Wesleyan Mission House) to John Lefevre (Colonial Office), 16 April 1834, p. 406. 2 TNA, CO 318

in Missionaries and modernity
The Negro Education Grant and Nonconforming missionary societies in the 1830s
Felicity Jensz

See, for example, TNA, CO 318/118, 12 April 1834, Jabez Bunting (Wesleyan Mission House) to John Lefevre (Colonial Office), pp. 403–405; TNA, CO 318/118, 8 April 1834, John Dyer (Secretary, Baptist Missionary Society) to Johan Lefevre, Esq. Under Secretary of State to the Colonies, pp. 399–402. 100

in Missionaries and modernity
Felicity Jensz

Wickramasinghe, Sri Lanka , p. 80. 196 CMS/B/OMS/C CE O23/12, Report of the Kanian Itinerary for the year ending September 30 1873. 197 TNA, CO 318/118 West India Miscellaneous 1834, vol. 1, Public Office, Jabez Bunting (Wesleyan Mission House) to John Lefevre

in Missionaries and modernity
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Michael D. Leigh

became the Methodists’ unofficial wartime headquarters, just as U Po Tun was their unofficial leader. 16 Wesley Church Mandalay had been gutted during the bombing raids of April 1942 and the Japanese requisitioned the Mission House and the Girls High School soon afterwards. The Methodists reopened a small school in Mahazayabon and they held weekly services in Saya Klaipo’s house. 17 The regular Burmese congregation was augmented from time to time by an eclectic mixture of Buddhists, ‘Burmese princes’ and

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
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The Neuendettelsau missionaries’ encounter with language and myth in New Guinea
Daniel Midena

about religious practices. 23 Moreover, New Guineans – whether out of sympathy, politeness or perhaps just exasperation – chose on occasion to adopt the missionaries’ grammatical mistakes rather than correct them. 24 Finally, the New Guineans sometimes grew tired at having to explain every new word and thus self-limited their vocabulary. In a letter to the mission house in 1897, Flierl described how documenting stories proved a means to circumvent these

in Savage worlds
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Panikos Panayi

in the most unbroken harmony; humility, peace, and love reign there in a higher degree than the writer ever remembers to have witnessed elsewhere.’ 95 On 14 August 1863, Christian Gotthilf Weigle stood before the door of the Basel mission house and would train there for four years before departing for India on 3 October 1867. 96 Samuel Hebich also spent time in the mission house in Basel, having

in The Germans in India
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Panikos Panayi

other locations. In fact, in many cases the missionaries lived in the mission house, which dominated the stations established by missionaries of all denominations throughout the world. Within the individual rooms the Europeans tried to recreate an ordered existence, separate from that of the indigenous population, in which the wife played a central role. 90 Clearly, the construction of

in The Germans in India
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Panikos Panayi

. ‘Our poor chapel found itself within the town, wedged between the houses and the heathen.’ 85 Figure 4.2 The Basel mission house in Kety Kety and Pudukotei provide examples of small mission

in The Germans in India