Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Methods and Guides x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Linda Davies and Gemma Shields

uncertainty around the likely costs of a particular health activity and to compare this against a ‘willingness to pay’ threshold, in order to judge their value for money. Economic evaluations can be done as part of randomised controlled trials or can draw on evidence taken from other sources (e.g. surveys). Similar to clinical evidence, economic evidence needs to be updated and researched as new questions arise or more evidence becomes available. Learning objectives By the end of this chapter you should be able to: 1. Understand why economic evaluations are needed 2

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Owen Price and Karina Lovell

Chapter 3: Quantitative research design Owen Price and Karina Lovell Chapter overview Quantitative research uses large samples and, as such, the findings of well-conducted studies can often be generalised to larger populations. However, it is important that studies are well-designed to avoid errors in their interpretation and/or the reporting of inaccurate results. Misleading results from quantitative studies can have serious negative implications such as wasting public money on flawed policies and subjecting service users to ineffective or harmful treatments

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Andrew C. Grundy

the proposed methods will answer the research question; that the study represents good value for money; that it be conducted safely and in line with ethical guidelines (see chapter 9); and that the research team are the right people to do the work (Aldridge and Derrington, 2012). 15 BEE (RESEARCH) PRINT.indd 15 11/05/2018 16:14 Funders will also want to see that the proposal is well structured and is written simply and clearly, including a summary of the proposed research which is accessible and understandable to members of the public (Aldridge and Derrington

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

seventeenth century, for example, were based in coffee houses, allowing interested individuals to exchange a small sum of money for refreshment, discussion, negotiations and the exchange of ideas, and often included the sharing of news both verbally and through pamphlets and newsletters. If we take the sciences as one starting point, academies were formally established in London, Paris, Florence and Rome during the seventeenth century (Riskin, 2008 ; Hooper-Greenhill, 1992 ) and are seen by many as the first significant move towards professional meeting places beyond the

in Creative research communication
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

bought by a commercial company with a view to making money out of our individual activities? The same, of course, can be said of the large public social networks and the ways that they seek to monetise the collective and individual creativity of their users; there has been much discussion of the way that companies such as Google and Facebook use the information we wittingly and unwittingly provide (see, for example, Fuchs, 2014 ). Practical engagement Kaplan and Haenlein ( 2010 ) present a typology of social media that is useful in orienting the way

in Creative research communication
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

must contain at least one main clause which, in turn, has to include a main verb. 10 A main verb is one which has a meaning on its own, one that can be found in a dictionary. Although the extract below contains two (italicised) strings of words punctuated as if they are sentences, both lack a main verb. The whole quotation appears in a novel as part of conversation, where the author is seeking to reproduce the way people speak. Money’s tight. If one member of the family goes bust the burden falls on the rest. All shut up together. Nothing coming in

in The craft of writing in sociology