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Money, Commerce, Language, and the Horror of Modernity in ‘The Isle of Voices’
Robbie Goh

Money, not merely as subject in literature but also in its very form and function, exhibits qualities of spectral evanescence, fetishised power over the imagination, and the uncontrollable transgression of boundaries and limits, which closely parallel the concerns and anxieties of Gothic literature. Yet it is in the writings of economic theorists and commentators on market society like Adam Smith and Karl Marx that these Gothic anxieties about money are most clearly articulated. Stevensons short story ‘The Isle of Voices’, read in the context of his comments on money in his other writings, is one of the few fictional texts which uses these properties of money to create what might be called a ‘financial Gothic’ narrative, which nevertheless has insights and implications for the narratives of capitalist modernity in general.

Gothic Studies
Melissa Edmundson

Throughout the nineteenth century, the term ‘uncomfortable houses’ was used to describe properties where restless spirits made life unpleasant for any living persons who tried to claim these supernatural residences as their own. This article uses the idea of ‘uncomfortable houses’ to examine how this ghostly discomfort related to larger cultural issues of economics and class in Victorian Britain. Authors such as Charlotte Riddell and Margaret Oliphant used the haunted house story as a means of social critique which commented on the financial problems facing many lower- and middle-class Victorians. Their stories focus on the moral development of the protagonists and reconciliation through the figure of the ghost, ultimately giving readers the happy endings that many male-authored ghost stories lack. Riddell‘s ‘The Old House in Vauxhall Walk’ and ‘Walnut-Tree House’ and Oliphant‘s ‘The Open Door’ serve as important examples of this ‘suburban Gothic’ literature.

Gothic Studies
Daisy Connon

Towards a Theory for African Cinema is an English translation of a talk given in French by the Tunisian filmmaker and critic Férid Boughedir (1944–) at a conference on international cinema, which took place in Montreal in 1974. In his presentation Boughedir discusses the vocation of the African filmmaker, who must avoid succumbing to the escapism and entertainment values of Western cinema and instead strive to reflect the contradictions and tensions of the colonised African identity, while promoting a revitalisation of African culture. Drawing on the example of the 1968 film Mandabi (The Money Order) by the Senegalese director Sembène Ousmane, Boughedir conceptualises a form of cinema which resists the influences of both Hollywood and auteur film and awakens viewers, instead of putting them to sleep. Boughedir‘s source text is preceded by a translator‘s introduction, which situates his talk within contemporary film studies.

Film Studies
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

focusing on furniture and furnishings. Among other things, this entailed installing softer lighting, distributing simple materials to filter the harsh florescent bulbs, erecting divides to address the lack of privacy and adding splashes of colour and comfort throughout. It was, I immediately felt, an important if modest idea. The three Viennese projects were simple but effective, cheap but transformative, fast but sensitive. They had been implemented with small amounts of money

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

own societies, especially as reformists of the centre left and right (Clinton, Blair) came to dominate the party-political scene after Thatcher and Reagan embedded the neoliberal revolution of the 1980s. After the Cold War, in other words, the liberal world order was a fact of life. In Margaret Thatcher’s immortal words, ‘there is no alternative’. The consequences of this focus on private enterprise, mobile money, weakened unions, reduced state welfare and regulation and lower taxes are all too visible today in areas like wealth inequality and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Response to the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs Special Issue on Innovation in Humanitarian Action (JHA, 1:3)
Anna Skeels

portfolio, in 2011 we funded a body of early-stage innovations across multiple technical humanitarian sectors and problem areas. With the humanitarian innovation agenda relatively immature, it was necessary to put money into the system to foster creativity, generate promising ideas and gain momentum. This led to a wide and dispersed portfolio. Now, at the time of writing in 2019, working closely with sector experts, strategic partners and the humanitarian innovation community, our funding is deliberately and purposively aligned to our key thematic areas of focus – water

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Fabrice Weissman

organisations could face a public backlash and even state prosecution if they were to reveal transactions with criminal organisations and terrorists. Lastly, there is no benefit in making abductions an issue of public debate. Pirates and other criminal groups do not care about their image or public pressure, while jihadist groups like al-Qaida openly acknowledge relying on kidnappings for money. These are the reasons regularly brought up by humanitarian and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Law and Politics of Responding to Attacks against Aid Workers
Julia Brooks and Rob Grace

their colleagues’ release. This option contravened the NGO’s explicit policies, but given the urgency and gravity of the situation, with their colleagues’ lives at stake, the aid workers in the field perceived that this option might be the only viable choice. Other aid agencies had experienced similar kidnapping crises in the same context. Rumours circulated about how much money organisations had paid, but publicly, agencies issued only blanket denials that money had been paid at all. Only through an informal, personal connection that one international staff member

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction ( UNISDR, 2015 ). More recently Build Back Safer has been in favour ( Kennedy et al. , 2008 ). At the time of the tsunami response there was a well-intentioned notion that Aceh, Sri Lanka and other affected regions should be built back better than before ( Fan, 2013 ). The amount of money available after the tsunami – there has never been so much aid money either before or since with US$14 billion pledged or donated – allowed for such aspirations ( TEC, 2006 ). However, the reality of most post-disaster responses, with low

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

Shamali, a poor neighbourhood in East Amman. She excitedly told us about her recent cooking class and plans to buy a kitchen device for preparing kibbe , a traditional Syrian dish that she sells to her neighbours. Marwa’s income from home-made catering complements the little money her husband makes by selling vegetables in an open-air market, and allows the family to keep their three teenage children in school. Unlike in her pre-war life, Marwa goes out on her own to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs