Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 196 items for :

  • Manchester Gothic x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Wilkie Collins’s ghosts
Andrew Smith

), which addresses the issue of money and its relationship to identity which characterised Dickens’s ghost stories. However, before discussing The Haunted Hotel it is important to examine some of Collins’s major writings of his heyday in the 1860s – The Woman in White (1860), No Name (1862), and Armadale (1866) – as they foreshadow his later representations of the ghostly. 2 Both The Woman in

in The ghost story, 1840–1920
The female ghost story
Andrew Smith

It is crucial to acknowledge the major contribution that women writers made to the ghost story during the period. The selection of authors discussed here is necessarily limited but gives a representative flavour of how women writers engaged with the specific issues of love, money, and history. There is the danger that such a thematic approach simplifies the range of the female

in The ghost story, 1840–1920
Money, Commerce, Language, and the Horror of Modernity in ‘The Isle of Voices’
Robbie Goh

Money, not merely as subject in literature but also in its very form and function, exhibits qualities of spectral evanescence, fetishised power over the imagination, and the uncontrollable transgression of boundaries and limits, which closely parallel the concerns and anxieties of Gothic literature. Yet it is in the writings of economic theorists and commentators on market society like Adam Smith and Karl Marx that these Gothic anxieties about money are most clearly articulated. Stevensons short story ‘The Isle of Voices’, read in the context of his comments on money in his other writings, is one of the few fictional texts which uses these properties of money to create what might be called a ‘financial Gothic’ narrative, which nevertheless has insights and implications for the narratives of capitalist modernity in general.

Gothic Studies
Melissa Edmundson

Throughout the nineteenth century, the term ‘uncomfortable houses’ was used to describe properties where restless spirits made life unpleasant for any living persons who tried to claim these supernatural residences as their own. This article uses the idea of ‘uncomfortable houses’ to examine how this ghostly discomfort related to larger cultural issues of economics and class in Victorian Britain. Authors such as Charlotte Riddell and Margaret Oliphant used the haunted house story as a means of social critique which commented on the financial problems facing many lower- and middle-class Victorians. Their stories focus on the moral development of the protagonists and reconciliation through the figure of the ghost, ultimately giving readers the happy endings that many male-authored ghost stories lack. Riddell‘s ‘The Old House in Vauxhall Walk’ and ‘Walnut-Tree House’ and Oliphant‘s ‘The Open Door’ serve as important examples of this ‘suburban Gothic’ literature.

Gothic Studies
Gender, Money and Property in the Ghost Stories of Charlotte Riddell
Victoria Margree

This article explores Riddells representational strategies around gender: in particular her male narrators and her female characters made monstrous by money. It argues that Riddell, conscious of social prohibitions on financial knowledge in women, employs male protagonists to subversive effect, installing in her stories a feminine wisdom about the judicious use of wealth. Her narratives identify the Gothic potential of money to dehumanise, foregrounding the culpability of economic arrangements in many of the horrors of her society. While they contain pronounced elements of social critique, they ultimately however defend late-Victorian capitalism by proff ering exemplars of the ethical financial practice by which moneys action is to be kept benign.

Gothic Studies
Exhumation and the autopsy of talent
William Hughes

likeness of Shakspeare! It's been done from a mask, taken from his own face, after death – I know it; I don't care what people say, I know it. Well, when we went home, I felt as if I'd seen Shakspeare himself, risen from the dead! Strangers would laugh if I told them so; but it's true – I did feel it. And this thought came across me, quick, like the shooting of a sudden pain: – I must make that face of Shakspeare mine; my possession, my companion, my great treasure that no money can pay for! And I've got it! – Here – the only cast in the world from the Stratford bust

in The dome of thought
Mesmerism, celebrity practitioners and the schism of 1842–3
William Hughes

. The whole statement crystallises the correspondent's central objection to Spencer Hall – the belief that this artisan practitioner is a mountebank or charlatan, to be numbered ‘among those persons who obtain money under false pretences’. ‘ Greenwood ’ is most likely Mr Greenwood, a well-reported magistrate presiding at the Thames police office at the close of the preceding decade. 24 The correspondent closes his unequivocally hostile account of Hall's aspirations with a

in The dome of thought
Trance in early modern Scotland
Georgie Blears

would use a ‘science … called slinnenacd ’ (shoulder-blade): ‘looking into [a]‌ bone they will tell if whoredome be committed in the Ouners house; what money the Master of the sheep had, [and] if any will die out of that house for that moneth’. 75 These seers had perhaps realised the potential of cultivating monotonous focus, and were using objects to further harness their ability to enter into trances and consequently receive visions that could aid the community. Some authors believed there to be a hierarchy of seers. This is indicated in a story that Martin

in The supernatural in early modern Scotland
Jane Ridder- Patrick

Edinburgh who would tell him who the thief was. Hog sent his man John Wood to the astrologer, David Ewart, with money and Seal’s letter. Ewart sent back a paper describing the thief in detail, writing that he ‘dwelt southward from the place that he was of sandie coloured hair, blew watering eyes with a big brow having a scar in his hedd on whierr there is no hair, and that he was ane old souldier or smith’. 40 On 25 April 1669, Hog and Wood appeared before Humbie kirk session and confessed to consulting Ewart: ‘Whereupon the said James Hog and Johne Wood were sharplie

in The supernatural in early modern Scotland
Abstract only
An economic theory of the ghost story
Andrew Smith

the Gothic they nevertheless inform a particular model of the Gothic imagination which appears in Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Charlotte Riddell, and more subtly, Henry James. Punter identifies ambivalence as central to Gothic representations of class, desire, and history and it is also key to understanding the relationship between theories of money and the Gothic. The danger is that one could be crudely

in The ghost story, 1840–1920