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E.A. Jones

occupy an endowed hermitage and live off its income: the chapel of the hermits of Cripplegate, London [ 40 ], was sufficiently well furnished at the end of the thirteenth century to be worth plundering, and the hermit himself was in a position to lend money to a group of substantial London merchants. But most hermit-chapels would have been in the same position as the hermitage on Highgate Hill [ 39 ], having ‘no yearly rents of

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

evidently did not follow him into reclusion, but remained at the chapel as his link to the outside world. Although this petition of 1328 shows a recently made anchorite starting to make provision for the practicalities of infirmity and death, he may have acted prematurely: the ‘brothers of Oath’ were left money in a local landowner’s will in 1340. But the chapel was in disrepair by 1373, and had fallen out of use by the sixteenth century. No

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

Creator . 27 He who falsifies the truth of judgment because he has been corrupted by material greed changes the truth of God into a lie. He who forsakes God for money serves the creature more than the Creator. Heretics who sow many errors contrary to the truth of faith falsify the truth of doctrine, regarding which the Apostle says: In the last days some will depart from the faith , following spirits of error and

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

…   Item paid unto Mr Dean for money given to the anchoress at the nuns of Stamford towards her finding [ financial support ] 10s (iii) Item the 7th day of December [1505] given unto the prioress of the nuns of Stamford at the profession of the anchoress there 20s 40

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

worthy man, to which he responded, ‘I would prefer to give my daughter to a man in need of money than to money in need of a man’. 11 Also, a man about to take a wife ought not to dwell on her beauty as lascivious youths do because beauty in a woman is dangerous both to behold and to possess. To behold, because often it cheats the man who beholds it. As Solomon says, charm is

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

zeal, especially against simoniacs, that he pursued them everywhere. And indeed, when the archbishop of Embrun had been corrupted by the vice of simony—becoming involved in simony by wishing to provide for himself—he even corrupted all his accusers by gifts of money. 127 But when the aforesaid legate [Hildebrand] investigated him due to the loud voices of rumour, he was not able to find any suitable witnesses against

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

man for Christ, should desire nothing, have nothing, nor ask for anything in God’s name, unless it is strictly necessary for sustaining his body. He should not carry silver or gold or money with him when he is on the road, except for three purposes: that is, for mending his cell, or building a new one, or for mending essential clothes or books, or for carrying out other work. For example, if people give alms to him rather

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

grant; and that on St Loy’s [Eligius, 25 June], St Dunstan’s [19 May] and other saints’ days, he would solemnly carry, or have carried, images of St Loy, St Dunstan, and other saints, around the public streets and profane places, attracting our subjects by giving money to them in order that

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

diligence they could venerate one who was absent as if he were present . 6 The third cause was excessive greed. For craftsmen and painters and silversmiths made these extremely beautiful gilded images and pictures, and they claimed they were gods. In this way they deceived simple souls by the great beauty of these images, and made a great deal of money out of them. For this

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
E.A. Jones

the dissolution of the monasteries in the sixteenth, at least 35 and perhaps as many as 47 solitaries appear in the record. Norman Tanner estimates that ‘From the 1420s to the 1470s there were probably at least eight hermits and anchorites living in the city at any given time’. 17 In 1271, the Oxford merchant Nicholas de Weston left money to nine anchorites in and around that city. When Henry Lord Scrope made his will in 1415 (he was about to be

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550