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C. E. Beneš

. 30 The verb inquirere implies official investigation, being the root of both ‘inquest’ and ‘inquisition’. (Like the Dominican order, the papal inquisition had been founded in the early thirteenth century to combat heresy.) 31 GL , p. 342

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Jews as Europeans in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries
John Edwards

. 26 See note 18, above. 27 Documents 3 and 4 (iii). 28 The best brief introduction to the Papal Inquisition and its early work is Bernard Hamilton, The Medieval lnquisition , London, 1981 . Also see W. A. Wakefield, Heresy, Crusade and

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
John Edwards

the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, including the earlier insistence that Jews had to be preserved as a remnant of the former Chosen People of God, and not destroyed. 5 Thereafter, the Papal Inquisition, which had been set up in the reign of that same pope Gregory IX to investigate and repress unorthodox belief within the Church itself, became increasingly interested in Jews, both

in The Jews in western Europe 1400–1600
Janet Hamilton
,
Bernard Hamilton
, and
Yuri Stoyanov

which papa Nicetas had introduced. The papal Inquisition, created by Gregory IX in 1233 to deal with Cathars, was never established in Frankish Greece, but some of its officials were interested in what was happening there. Rainier Sacconi, a former Cathar minister who became Inquisitor for Lombardy, included a list of Bogomil churches in the Summa , or Treatise, about

in Christian dualist heresies in the Byzantine world c. 650–c. 1450
Abstract only
Janet Hamilton
,
Bernard Hamilton
, and
Yuri Stoyanov

This chapter contains a selection of translated and annotated texts on the rise of Christian dualism and its influence in the Byzantine world.

in Christian dualist heresies in the Byzantine world c. 650–c. 1450