Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "Political thought" x
  • Manchester International Relations x
  • International Relations x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Andrew Williams

debates have been mediated (or not) into the policy processes of, particularly, the Anglo-Saxon powers that have dominated the debate on the NWO in the twentieth century. The idea that it might be possible to create an NWO that would improve the global political, social and economic environment might be seen as a key leitmotif of much political thought since (at least) Kant. The nineteenth century saw a plethora of plans in this direction.1 In the twentieth century this has taken a different turn as the might of the United States and the growth of the influence of

in Failed imagination?
Ahmad H. Sa’di

rooted in the minds of Zionist leaders and was embedded in Zionist political thought all along. Lately, Pappe (2006) has made the case that the expulsion of the Palestinians was an act of ethnic cleansing, which was guided and supervised by Ben-Gurion and a small group of his aids. Nonetheless, the fact that Palestinians remained in Israel, particularly in the Galilee, which was occupied at the end of the war, needed an explanation. Morris cited this fact as a vindication of his thesis and a refutation of his critics. Hillel Cohen (2008) went one step further by

in Thorough surveillance
Abstract only
The third American NWO – the Clinton and Bush presidencies, 1990–2006
Andrew Williams

‘good claim to being the individual most responsible for broadening the imaginative horizons of Victorian political thought’. He was clearly a ‘realist’ in that he is often74 seen as being in the same political lineage as George Kennan, Martin Wight, Herbert Butterfield or Reinhold Niebuhr, some key members of the realist canon, whom we have also identified as NWO thinkers of distinction. Bell shows how Seeley has been subsumed into what Karma Nabulsi calls the ‘martialist’ tradition of late nineteenth-century thinkers who lauded the development of the British Empire

in Failed imagination?
Ahmad H. Sa’di

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/19/2013, SPi 7 Political rights under a military rule Irreconcilable conceptualization? Citizenship, as a bundle of rights and as experience, is regarded in the political thought as a safeguard for the citizens against excesses by the state or by powerful groups (e.g. Marshall, 1950). Among these, political rights have been associated with highly esteemed notions such as the sovereignty of the people. However, what could the meaning of political rights be under a state of exception, where the basic rights, which enable citizens to

in Thorough surveillance
Andrew Williams

in International Relations’, History of Political Thought, vol. 13, no. 2, Summer 1992. 67 Some recent literature on this includes: Barry Buzan, ‘The Timeless Wisdom of Realism?’, in Steve Smith, Ken Booth and Marysia Zalewski (eds), International Theory: Positivism and Beyond (Cambridge University Press, 1996), pp. 47–65; Jaap de Wilde and Hakan Wiberg (eds), Organized Anarchy in Europe: The MUP/Williams/ch6 209 23/10/98, 11:50 am 210 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 MUP/Williams/ch6 Failed imagination? Role of Intergovernmental Organizations (London, I

in Failed imagination?
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

political thought in the later nineteenth and early twentieth centuries’ (Anter 2014: 48). Contemporary historical sociology has added nuances to a Weberian state theory that many consider unfinished (Anter 2014: 1–2; Mann 1993: 58). Mann’s ‘institutional statism’ sought to synthesise two currents that until then had seen the state either as a place to host particular interests or as an actor, entirely driven by an elite administration. Mann’s categorisation allows us to see some of the flaws in the approaches to the conflict in the DRC and current peacebuilding policy

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Abstract only
Germany in American post-war International Relations
Felix Rösch

led to this ‘silencing’. How was it possible that their German intellectual socialisation that continued to inform their political thought became overlooked and indeed no longer even realised? It is argued that German émigrés and American International Relations (IR) constitute a case of successful integration. Before this argument is further expounded, it has to be acknowledged that émigré scholars partly caused this silencing themselves. After their forced emigration, they were at pains to adjust their research and teaching to the different intellectual and

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
Abstract only
Changing images of Germany
Jens Steffek
and
Leonie Holthaus

has received less attention so far. He shows how a distinctively German intellectual socialisation and a German style of argument continued to inform the political thought of the émigré scholars and how that fact became increasingly overlooked. As Rösch argues, it has to be acknowledged that émigré scholars at least partly caused this silencing themselves. After their forced emigration, they were at pains to adjust their research and teaching to the different intellectual and historical backgrounds of their American colleagues and students. They did so not only in

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
Leonie Holthaus

, 2006 ), p. 397 . 6 C. Sylvest , British Liberal Internationalism, 1880–1930: Making Progress? ( Manchester : Manchester University Press , 2009 ), p. 46 . 7 Sylvest, British Liberal Internationalism , pp. 200–6. 8 D. Bell and C. Sylvest , ‘ International society in Victorian political thought: T.H. Green, Herbert Spencer, and Henry Sidgwick ’, Modern Intellectual History , 3 : 2 ( 2006 ), pp. 207 – 38 , at p. 230 . 9 C. Hobson , The Rise of Democracy: Revolution, War, and Transformations in International Politics since 1776 ( Edinburgh

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
The Weimar Republic in the eyes of American political science
Paul Petzschmann

started arriving in the 1930s, America was hardly a blank slate as far as Germany was concerned. The new arrivals had to contend with existing perceptions of German political thought and institutions. This chapter will explore the lively interest American political science showed in the Weimar Republic and its Constitution. Perceptions and commentary on Weimar were framed in terms of historical continuity, comparison with the post-bellum US and larger questions about the nature of sovereignty during the interwar period. Positive American views of Germany, as explored

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks