Search results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "Political thought" x
  • Manchester International Relations x
  • Manchester Political Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Germany in American post-war International Relations
Felix Rösch

led to this ‘silencing’. How was it possible that their German intellectual socialisation that continued to inform their political thought became overlooked and indeed no longer even realised? It is argued that German émigrés and American International Relations (IR) constitute a case of successful integration. Before this argument is further expounded, it has to be acknowledged that émigré scholars partly caused this silencing themselves. After their forced emigration, they were at pains to adjust their research and teaching to the different intellectual and

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
Abstract only
Changing images of Germany
Jens Steffek
and
Leonie Holthaus

has received less attention so far. He shows how a distinctively German intellectual socialisation and a German style of argument continued to inform the political thought of the émigré scholars and how that fact became increasingly overlooked. As Rösch argues, it has to be acknowledged that émigré scholars at least partly caused this silencing themselves. After their forced emigration, they were at pains to adjust their research and teaching to the different intellectual and historical backgrounds of their American colleagues and students. They did so not only in

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
Leonie Holthaus

, 2006 ), p. 397 . 6 C. Sylvest , British Liberal Internationalism, 1880–1930: Making Progress? ( Manchester : Manchester University Press , 2009 ), p. 46 . 7 Sylvest, British Liberal Internationalism , pp. 200–6. 8 D. Bell and C. Sylvest , ‘ International society in Victorian political thought: T.H. Green, Herbert Spencer, and Henry Sidgwick ’, Modern Intellectual History , 3 : 2 ( 2006 ), pp. 207 – 38 , at p. 230 . 9 C. Hobson , The Rise of Democracy: Revolution, War, and Transformations in International Politics since 1776 ( Edinburgh

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
The Weimar Republic in the eyes of American political science
Paul Petzschmann

started arriving in the 1930s, America was hardly a blank slate as far as Germany was concerned. The new arrivals had to contend with existing perceptions of German political thought and institutions. This chapter will explore the lively interest American political science showed in the Weimar Republic and its Constitution. Perceptions and commentary on Weimar were framed in terms of historical continuity, comparison with the post-bellum US and larger questions about the nature of sovereignty during the interwar period. Positive American views of Germany, as explored

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks
Sarah von Billerbeck

). Schmidt , Vivien ( 2006 ), ‘ Institutionalism ’, in Colin Hay , Michael Lister , and David Marsh (eds), The State: Theories and Issues ( Houndmills : Palgrave Macmillan ), 98–117 . Schmidt , Vivien ( 2014 ), ‘ Institutionalism ’, in Michael T. Gibbons (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Political Thought ( London : John Wiley and Sons ), 1

in United Nations peace operations and International Relations theory
Abstract only
Charles T. Hunt

Theory of International Politics (Waltz 1979 ), a more direct importation of concepts derived from complexity theory is a more recent development. The shortcomings of orthodox IR theories – such as (neo-)realism and (neo-)liberalism, predicated on linear paradigms borrowed from Newtonian science and the political thoughts of Hobbes, Descartes, and Locke (Rihani 2002 : 3) – in predicting milestone events in global politics such as the end of the Cold War or the 2007 global financial crisis led some scholars to see complexity theory as an alternative framework for

in United Nations peace operations and International Relations theory
Edwin Borchard between New Haven and Berlin
Jens Steffek
and
Tobias Heinze

isolationism derived from the diagnosis. The alternative to the League of Nations that he promoted was a return to the balance of power politics of the pre-1914 era, with the US intervening abroad only when its vital interests were at stake. Borchard really wanted to turn back time and this may explain why his influence was not lasting. In the interwar years, his political thought, characterised by ‘consistency, completeness, and an abiding sense of certainty’, 119 still found followers. After America’s victory in the Second World War, his stubborn isolationism appeared

in Prussians, Nazis and Peaceniks