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with Ronald Preston – like him, a Sheffield protégé of Leslie Hunter – who was residentiary canon theologian from 1957, sub-dean in 1970–71, and remained active in the Cathedral as an honorary canon while Professor of Social and Pastoral Theology at the University from 1970. Preston was one of the foremost Anglican writers on social ethics in the post-war period, taking forward the Christian socialist tradition of R. H. Tawney (who had taught him at the LSE) but tempering it with the realism of Reinhold Niebuhr

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
Uriya Shavit and Ofir Winter

from studying the Zionist enterprise Conclusion 185 highlights several points of agreement. Despite their many deep ideological differences, Islamists and liberals alike have identified social cohesion, political realism and activism, long-term planning, scientific and technological development, gender equality and pluralistic democracy as important factors in Israel’s success. These are valuable lessons for the Arab world. They are just as valuable for Israelis when debating the future of their state.

in Zionism in Arab discourses
John Carter Wood

for the social order and ‘Christian thinkers’ to ‘blend theological thought with sociological knowledge’. 51 Oldham agreed but complained to Temple that, unfortunately, ‘some of the theologians’ were the ‘most stupid’ about faith and society: their rarefied ‘theological atmosphere’ was remote from ‘the actual world’. 52 Nonetheless, five theological influences on the group stand out: (1) domestic traditions of ‘liberalism’; (2) the ‘Christian realism’ of Reinhold Niebuhr; (3) the neo-Thomist philosophy of Jacques Maritain; (4) ‘continental’ Protestant theology

in This is your hour
Abstract only
Heather Walton

lies behind this literary preference and, if so, is this one which we would wish to buy into? We may also wish to question the dominant, if unstated, assumption that the apparent veracity of realism represents the only way of writing literature that is sufficiently trustworthy to carry the precious burden of women’s pain and women’s aspirations. Kristeva has encouraged us to see realism as perhaps the literary form least able to embody revolution within language. Irigaray has demonstrated that the ‘real world’ is in fact the world of the male imaginary and that the

in Literature, theology and feminism
John Carter Wood

supplement was ‘exceptionally sensitive to what is going on in the world’. 154 ‘Spiritual resources which others have not’: asserting Christian distinctiveness Group members were clearly willing to cross the religious–secular frontier, but they also reinforced it by identifying what they saw as Christianity’s distinctive political and social contributions. In the CNL ’s first issue, Oldham listed four ‘Christian’ ideas: belief in ‘an objective rightness in things’, ‘extreme realism’, a ‘creative spirit’, and the

in This is your hour
Heather Walton

his study of the great nineteenth century novels to approach the text with attention to plot, character, event and action. His Jesus is an agent in a ‘narratable plot’ (1993). ‘The form of the gospel is so novel-like’ that Jesus must be understood in the same way as we would understand a character in a realist novel (1993: 46). Frei has learnt to surrender himself to the panoramic view of the world presented in the novelistic text and to trust that its ‘realism’ guarantees the authenticity of all that is there encountered. On all these matters he is quite candid. In

in Literature, theology and feminism
Heather Walton

neologisms, tropes, hyperbole and richly metaphoric language in order to communicate a challenge to the conventional realism of the humanist tradition. Rosi Braidotti argues that poststructuralist theory has strategically adopted these literary forms because poetry was discovered to be an effective instrument of liberation by those who wished to represent the world in new ways (1994: 36). Women poststructuralist writers struggling to find means to express ideas which are contrary to the deep values undergirding Western culture have been particularly bold in breaking the

in Literature, theology and feminism
A new church for the unhoused
Michael Cronin

controversial auction of letters detailing the horrors of the Irish Famine. Davoc Rynne, the owner of the company, Irish Celt, that put the letter up for auction, said in his defence, ‘I can understand that [negative reaction] but we live in a capitalist society, so what can we do? I had to buy it’ (McGarry 2010).The MD of Irish Celt simply articulated what has become a fatalistic commonplace in late modernity. The writer and theorist Mark Fisher has dubbed this commonplace ‘capitalist realism’, which he defines as ‘the widespread sense that not only is capitalism the only

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Open Access (free)
Lara Apps and Andrew Gow

complex. To whom does the label apply? Given that for most people today, or at least most potential readers of this book, early modern witchcraft was not ‘real’, what does it mean to refer to a historical subject as a witch, without quotation marks around the word? The question leads directly into a thorny tangle of issues, including realism, referentiality, agency, and subjectivity. There is not enough space here to do full justice

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Uriya Shavit and Ofir Winter

1967 to 1973, the rejection of peace; from 1973 to 1990, partial realism, in Egypt only; from 1991 onward, Arab realism where most Arab countries are willing to, and even interested in, reaching peace with Israel, and differ from each other only in their terms.81 In 1974, Ibrahim published a book against the budding cooperation between Egypt and the United States. In 2000, he released an updated edition of that book, and in the preface he did not spare himself criticism of his previous views: The Syrian model is the closest to what I have demanded from Sadat’s Egypt

in Zionism in Arab discourses