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Author: Nicholas Royle

This book provides a lucid, wide-ranging and up-to-date critical introduction to the writings of Hélène Cixous (1937–). Cixous is often considered ‘difficult’. Moreover she is extraordinarily prolific, having published dozens of books, essays, plays and other texts. Royle avoids any pretence of a comprehensive survey, instead offering a rich and diverse sampling. At once expository and playful, original and funny, this micrological approach enables a new critical understanding and appreciation of Cixous’s writing. If there is complexity in her work, Royle suggests, there is also uncanny simplicity and great pleasure. The book focuses on key motifs such as dreams, the supernatural, literature, psychoanalysis, creative writing, realism, sexual differences, laughter, secrets, the ‘Mother unconscious’, drawing, painting, autobiography as ‘double life writing’, unidentifiable literary objects (ULOs), telephones, non-human animals, telepathy and the ‘art of cutting’. Particular stress is given to Cixous’s work in relation to Sigmund Freud and Jacques Derrida, as well as to her importance in the context of ‘English literature’. There are close readings of Shakespeare, Emily Brontë, P. B. Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Lewis Carroll, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, for example, alongside in-depth explorations of her own writings, from Inside (1969) and ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1975) up to the present. Royle’s book will be of particular interest to students and academics coming to Cixous’s work for the first time, but it will also appeal to readers interested in contemporary literature, creative writing, life writing, narrative theory, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, ecology, drawing and painting.

John Drakakis

Christian marriage at the end of The Taming of the Shrew , through the enforced silence of Beatrice in Much Ado About Nothing , to Macbeth’s fatal association of the words ‘surcease’ and ‘success’ ( Macbeth , 1.7.4). In Love’s Labour’s Lost the impossibility of a teleologically authenticated ending is far more extreme than the mixture of realism and idealism that leaves doubts in the minds of spectators about the veracity of what they have just witnessed. Love’s Labour’s Lost gives ‘some thing to the woman’ – a

in Shakespeare’s resources
Theatre, form, meme and reciprocity
John Drakakis

a fearful realism to what was otherwise regarded as an entertainment: It was a pretty part in the old Church-playes, when the nimble Vice would skip vp nimbly like a Iacke an Apes into the deuils necke, and ride the deuil a course, and belabour him with his wooden dagger, til he made him roare, wherat the people would laugh to see the deuil so vice-haunted. This action, & passiō had some semblance, by reason the deuil looked like a patible old Coridon , with a payre of ghornes on his

in Shakespeare’s resources
John Drakakis

even double) political statement – the less so because of the genre’s repudiation of realism (if not reality). 43 Hillman’s desire to avoid reducing the text’s manifest textuality to a single political statement that reflects a historical materiality drives him into a formal pluralism that risks obscuring the political work that the intertexts he identifies are doing. His emphasis on ‘difference’, formally appropriate though it may be, risks dragging him into another kind of politics that serves

in Shakespeare’s resources
Michael D. Friedman and Alan Dessen

); (2) to seek ‘realism’, often with an emphasis upon blood, severed heads, maiming, and brutality; (3) to focus on the bizarre features of the play, whether to single out the horrors in the Grand Guignol tradition or to treat the script as parody or burlesque (as in William Freimuth’s 1986–87 production for the Source Theatre Company of Washington, DC which, according to Margaret M. Tocci [ Shakespeare Bulletin , 5.2, March/April 1987, pp. 10–11] provided ‘liberal doses of knockabout farce and cheerful mayhem sprinkled

in Titus Andronicus
The ‘inward eie’
Anne Sweeney

It is this encouragement to articulate and interrogate personal feeling that makes the Ignatian Exercises so useful to an investigation of the creation in English poetry of a new psychological realism and emotional integrity. I would suggest. I agree with Frank Brownlow’s point that poetry is not meditation, and that affective devotion per se was a central feature of the Counter

in Robert Southwell

This book is the first ever concordance to the rhymes of Spenser’s epic. It gives the reader unparalleled access to the formal nuts and bolts of this massive poem: the rhymes which he used to structure its intricate stanzas.

As well as the main concordance to the rhymes, the volume features a wealth of ancillary materials, which will be of value to both professional Spenserians and students, including distribution lists and an alphabetical listing of all the words in The Faerie Queene. The volume breaks new ground by including two studies by Richard Danson Brown and J. B. Lethbridge, so that the reader is given provocative analyses alongside the raw data about Spenser as a rhymer. Brown considers the reception of rhyme, theoretical models and how Spenser’s rhymes may be reading for meaning. Lethbridge in contrast discusses the formulaic and rhetorical character of the rhymes.

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What price Titus?
Michael D. Friedman and Alan Dessen

to play the nightmare for all it is worth, or spare the audience’s feelings by avoiding too much realism (or seeming realism)’. Seale, Trevor Nunn, Jane Howell, Mark Rucker, and Deborah Warner chose to present that nightmare (‘when will this fearful slumber have an end?’) without recourse to red ribbons, red China silk, masks, or ritualised action. Thus, Colin Blakely, who had reservations about the ‘formal, almost ritualized style’ and the ‘symbolic and very cold’ violence of the Brook production, argued that in an

in Titus Andronicus
Michael D. Friedman and Alan Dessen

the play’s defects but also to the passage of time and to the consequent changes in notions about theatre, imagery, decorum, and ‘realism’? Thus, some of the supposed anomalies or howlers perceived by actors, directors, editors, and teachers may seem less daunting when viewed as integral parts of a larger pattern or sequence easily blurred by post-Elizabethan theatrical practice. As a point of departure, consider one gap between then and now that playgoers today take for granted (as part of our

in Titus Andronicus
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The Problem
Michael D. Friedman and Alan Dessen

majority of actors, directors, and designers conclude that Titus must be cut or adapted to be playable today, does that assessment reveal flaws in the script that survives in the quarto or does it reveal something important about our sense of theatre or ‘realism’ or style? For the historicist, do such cuts or changes provide any revealing ‘windows’ into the early 1590s, especially when directors on different continents, unaware of each other’s work, cut or change the same things? As will be evident in the

in Titus Andronicus