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Mark Olssen

Chapter 4 examines the senses in which continuance ethics derived from Foucault, Canguilhem, and Nietzsche can claim objectivity by comparing the sense of objectivity claimed to the metaphysical sense of objectivity argued for by Derek Parfit. While it is claimed that the objectivity established is certainly different to traditional metaphysical conceptions, it still warrants being labelled as objective, and is clearly not a species of subjectivism, the dominant approach in moral philosophy for most of the twentieth century. It is objective also in that it avoids any possibility of being classified as relativistic. After this cartography of the concept, Kantian ethics is considered and rejected. Life continuance is then restated as embodying a new reconciliation of the right with the good, as well as going beyond universalism to consider contingency and cultural difference as important contextual considerations.

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics
Abstract only
David McGrogan

of freedom” 4 which is achieved through putting positive obligations on the State to secure the conditions within which individuals can exercise freedom of choice, “without imposing any particular set of choices on individuals.” 5 In other words, the State must give to all individuals the material conditions in which they can “realize their own goals.” 6 For Oakeshott, the idea that such a reconciliation between negative and positive freedoms could be achieved was a myth. As his work shows us, the truth is that there is only ever a trade-off to be made

in Critical theory and human rights
Mark Olssen

clearly aimed at Marx and Hegel as philosophers who totalize history and who represent the state as a legitimate organ of domination and truth. For Hegel, it was dialectics that led to this totalization through the reconciliation of opposites by which all contradictions were overcome. Hegel had rejected the intuitionism of Fichte, Schelling, and Hölderlin, developing his thesis of the acquisition of knowledge through dialectical progression in history. 4 But the hidden and unacknowledged ghosts behind the scene were undoubtedly Newton, or perhaps all those who

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics
On the sociological paradoxes of weak dialectical formalism and embedded neoliberalism
Darrow Schecter

related issues that can be taken up in terms of the following question:  how might it be possible to provide a sociological methodological corrective to the widespread tendency to assume that there is a natural fit between formal knowledge and negative freedom? It may not be possible to do so in absolute terms as the perfect reconciliation of concept/​reality and humanity/​nature that Hegel may have had in mind. But it might at least be possible to adjust the existing boundaries between currently dominant institutional form and potentially more elastic, responsive

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Open Access (free)
Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’
Andrew Bowie

between ‘Criticism’ and ‘Dogmatism’, a project he characterises in terms of a reconciliation of Idealism and Realism, or of transcendental philosophy and Naturphilosophie. The main problem this involves is the primacy of the two approaches in relation to each other. Prioritising transcendental philosophy avoids dogmatism, but at the expense of rendering nature secondary to the I, and thus giving rise to Fichte’s problems. Naturphilosophie gives an account of the I’s ground in material nature, but seems to have to rely on dogmatic premises to do so – if nature can only

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Abstract only
Darrow Schecter

–​1989 will not work forever. Adorno shows that the conflicts proper to internally divided societies are dialectical rather than simply random or mechanically determined. In accordance with his reading, the concepts ‘internally divided’ and ‘dialectical’ presuppose each other. Simultaneous polarisation (class, exploitation, marginalisation) and homogen­ isation (coerced integration, reconciliation under duress) is therefore a paradoxical reality, not an incoherent or illogical contradiction.12 But this epistemological insight does not sufficiently inform Adorno’s ana­ lysis

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Peter J. Verovšek

’ ( Herren der Verträge ) that bind them together, in pooling significant portions of their decision-making capacity to create a ‘functional constitution’ at the supranational level, its member-states have created a new, pluralistic paradigm of transnational politics that questions the foundations of the state system dating back to the Treaty of Westphalia (1648). 2 Within this new architecture of governance ‘political practices of mediation and reconciliation have a primary role, to which legal means and institutions [have been] subordinated.’ 3 The development of a

in Memory and the future of Europe
Open Access (free)
The beginning of aesthetic theory and the end of art
Andrew Bowie

opposition and reconciliation. In the same way as all the notes of the chromatic scale may appear in a symphony at some point, and at the end will become part of the path to the re-establishing of the tonic key, the divisions involved in conceptual thinking are integrated into the teleology of the Idea, a sort of ultimate harmonic resolution. The power of this conception can perhaps best be experienced in a huge symphony like Bruckner’s Eighth, where the sheer length and complexity of the path to the final resolution make that resolution into the major tonic key so

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Open Access (free)
Catherine Baker

state and non-state political violence, with many surface parallels when fragmentation has loomed. Their different locations in the history of colonialism – though both are located there – reveal the comparison's limits most clearly (Baker 2016 ). Even that limited comparison, however, makes ideas about the Yugoslav region resonate with struggles for racial justice in my own country. Scholarship on post-conflict reconciliation and transitional justice in the region suggests histories of inter-communal violence and exploitation in the past need

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Mark Olssen

Chomsky, have levelled similar charges against him. 2 I will argue in this chapter that the principle of life continuance can undergird pluralism with criteria of inclusion and exclusion. As democracy is necessary to continuance as a mechanism for the reconciliation of disputes within groups and between individuals, failure to genuinely support democracy itself constitutes the outer limit of unity within which pluralism must operate. Difference within unity is the only coherent policy in this respect. Foucault arrives at political pluralism through his analysis of

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics