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Witnessing, retribution and domestic reform
John Borneman

11 Reconciliation after ethnic cleansing: witnessing, retribution and domestic reform John Borneman    conditions that might make possible reconciliation after ethnic cleansing? This chapter addresses reconciliation in light of specific ethnic cleansings and ‘ethnicisations’, with a focus on the most recent example in Bosnia. It neither elaborates a specific case nor makes specific historical–cultural comparisons. The potential contribution is theoretical, specifying psycho-social terms and processes integral to reconciliation after violent conflicts. The

in Potentials of disorder
The global reconciliation discourse and its local performance
Judith Renner

The global reconciliation discourse performs in particular on the local level as it is here, in post-conflict societies, that the reconciliation discourse is deployed as a tool of post-conflict peacebuilding. This chapter focuses on the example of Sierra Leone in order to explore how the global reconciliation discourse is brought to new local contexts and how it performs there. In particular, it aims to

in Discourse, normative change and the quest for reconciliation in global politics
Judith Renner

The spread of the reconciliation language as examined in the last chapter is not the only manifestation of the proliferation of reconciliation discourse, but it is accompanied by the diffusion of a corresponding set of reconciliation practices in global politics. More specifically, the proliferation of the language of reconciliation through truth-telling in truth commissions was paralleled by the

in Discourse, normative change and the quest for reconciliation in global politics
Cillian McGrattan

12 Responsibility, justice, and reconciliation in Northern Ireland Cillian McGrattan In an August 2014 interview, which was widely covered north and south of the border, the US diplomat and former senior aide to Bill Clinton, Nancy Soderberg, launched a blistering attack on Northern Ireland’s political class. Soderberg accused Northern Irish politicians of an ‘abysmal abdication of leadership’ in relation to what she saw as their failure to develop a coherent policy programme. They were ‘far too stuck in the past’, she asserted, which made ‘progress vulnerable

in Theories of International Relations and Northern Ireland
Darrow Schecter

IN the preceding chapter the five central strands of the theory of critical idealism articulated over the course of this book are woven together. The first appears for the first time in the introduction. It is indicated there that the most radical route to reconciliation between the various factions of humanity, and hence to positive freedom for citizens, can be ascertained by comparing the different

in Beyond hegemony
Darrow Schecter

philosophy provides the broad outlines of a theory of critical idealism that bears directly upon the organisation of the labour process and the first condition of legitimate law concerning humanity and external nature. Toward the end it will be seen that in the first instance legitimate law requires reconciliation between humanity and external nature, and that this, in turn, requires a form of libertarian socialism whose basic contours

in Beyond hegemony
Author: Judith Renner

This book offers a new and critical perspective on the global reconciliation technology by highlighting its contingent and highly political character as an authoritative practice of post-conflict peacebuilding. After retracing the emergence of the reconciliation discourse from South Africa to the global level, the book demonstrates how implementing reconciliation in post-conflict societies is a highly political practice which entails potentially undesirable consequences for the post-conflict societies to which it is deployed. Inquiring into the example of Sierra Leone, the book shows how the reconciliation discourse brings about the marginalization and neutralization of political claims and identities of local populations by producing these societies as being composed of the ‘victims’ and ‘perpetrators’ of past human rights violations which are first and foremost in need of reconciliation and healing.

Judith Renner

The reconciliation discourse that became hegemonic in South Africa did not remain limited to that country, but gained a more global reach in the years that followed the South African transition. From the end of the 1990s onwards the language of reconciliation, truth-telling and healing penetrated the discussions of scholars and political practitioners and came to be spoken in numerous political and

in Discourse, normative change and the quest for reconciliation in global politics
Bert Ingelaere

gacaca process. This will be the entry point to subsume disparate dynamics and features of the gacaca practice. 2 The truth is an elusive and multidimensional concept. In the report of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission four notions of truth are identified ( TRC-SA, 1998 : 110–17). The forensic truth entails answers to the basic questions of who, where, when, how and against whom and possibly the context, causes and patterns of violations. Other dimensions of the truth – narrative, social and restorative – go beyond this factual delineation

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

Federation. In fact, the idea of reconciliation had been central in the peace negotiation between Biafra and Nigeria even before the end of the war. People expressed concerns as to whether Biafrans would still be accepted back into the Federation as citizens with full rights. Biafrans, with the fear of genocide also wondered what their fate in the future Federation of Nigeria would be. When the war ended and there was no victor, no vanquished, everybody was happy. Then the Federal

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs