Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 143 items for :

  • "Reconciliation" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Regional integration and conflicts in Europe from the 1950s to the twenty-first century
Author: Boyka Stefanova

This book is about the European Union's role in conflict resolution and reconciliation in Europe. Ever since it was implemented as a political project of the post-World War II reality in Western Europe, European integration has been credited with performing conflict-resolution functions. The EU allegedly transformed the long-standing adversarial relationship between France and Germany into a strategic partnership. Conflict in Western Europe became obsolete. The end of the Cold War further reinforced its role as a regional peace project. While these evolutionary dynamics are uncontested, the deeper meaning of the process, its transformative power, is still to be elucidated. How does European integration restore peace when its equilibrium is broken and conflict or the legacies of enmity persist? This is a question that needs consideration. This book sets out to do exactly that. It explores the peace and conflict-resolution role of European integration by testing its somewhat vague, albeit well-established, macro-political rationale of a peace project in the practical settings of conflicts. Its central argument is that the evolution of the policy mix, resources, framing influences and political opportunities through which European integration affects conflicts and processes of conflict resolution demonstrates a historical trend through which the EU has become an indispensable factor of conflict resolution. The book begins with the pooling together of policy-making at the European level for the management of particular sectors (early integration in the European Coal and Steel Community) through the functioning of core EU policies (Northern Ireland).

Abstract only
Europeanisation breakthrough
Boyka Stefanova

conflict resolution were endogenous only, with trivial or random external influence. From this standpoint, the task of examining the EU’s role as a factor of peace and reconciliation in Northern Ireland is unproblematic. Most analyses agree that EU contributions have dwarfed the interventions of the UK and Ireland as principal stakeholders in the process and that in contrast to the United States, the EU

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
Daniel Loick

examples of Kant’s pure international law as well as Jewish diasporic law have proven, nor is legal violence the only possible way to struggle against social domination, as the example of direct action shows. 4.  Liberating law from violence Menke’s claim that law without violence is conceptually impossible has created a dilemma for his theory. On the one hand, Menke can no 108 108 Responses longer envision the utopia of social reconciliation (as the early Frankfurt School did), because that would contradict his claim about the irresolvable link between law and

in Law and violence
Abstract only
Christoph Menke

-​procedural judgment that is liberated from its violent rule over the extra-​or non-​legal. How is that possible? There is both a regressive and a reflective answer to this question. The regressive answer is: sublation of the difference between law and non-​law, reconciliation of law with the non-​ legal. This answer has its model in a teleological (or “aesthetic”) concept of pedagogy: According to the regressive answer, the violence of law is overcome by pedagogy, because pedagogy is concerned with the “soul of the living,” as even Benjamin still notes, it implies the “absence of

in Law and violence
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

At the heart of all efforts to bring about reconciliation in post-conflict societies is the question of how to deal with the victims of violence. The resolution of this issue is often considered the litmus test of a successful peace endeavour for societies emerging from conflict. Irrespective of whether restorative or retributive forms of justice are applied to a conflict, the recognition

in Conflict to peace
An interview with Wally Kirwan
Graham Spencer

dealings with the IRA or the republican movement in terms of bringing about the ceasefire. I came into it immediately after the ceasefire and my role as Secretary General for the Forum for Peace and Reconciliation was set up in response to that. The purpose of this was to bring parties together to discuss possibilities of dialogue and bring to light the issues that hindered peace. Was the Forum designed to

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
Abstract only
Bernadette C. Hayes and Ian McAllister

section examines the implications for post-conflict reconciliation. Community relations policy The conflict in Northern Ireland has long been defined as a problem of poor community relations between Protestants and Catholics, a view that has been particularly prevalent among the British establishment (Nagle and Clancy, 2010 ). Since the outbreak of the conflict in 1969, the British

in Conflict to peace
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley, and Catherine McGlynn

) This chapter explores post-conflict attitudes and behaviour of those former non-state combatants who have engaged in broader formations of social and political reconciliation and transformation through various post-prison and community initiatives. In so doing it examines how the influx of former prisoners into organisations such as Sinn Féin, the PUP and the UPRG has reshaped the political thinking of

in Abandoning historical conflict?
Peter Shirlow, Jonathan Tonge, James McAuley, and Catherine McGlynn

the search for funding for local conflict transformation and reconciliation projects (Shirlow and McEvoy, 2008). These radical developments have been facilitated by dialogue initiated by former prisoners, on an inter-communal basis through meetings with former prisoners on the opposing side and via intra-group dialogue. Former prisoners have attempted to persuade militants of

in Abandoning historical conflict?
Duncan Morrow

degree to which political change in recent years has promoted reconciliation. While there is no doubt that there have been major achievements in reducing violence and creating shared institutions, the challenges of reconciliation remain. The chapter concludes that Northern Ireland has the characteristics of a society caught between truce and transformation, which is evident in the weakness of

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict