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C. E. Beneš

Part three has four chapters. The first presents the etymologies regarding the Italic king Janus and a Trojan refugee named Janus. Chapter two gives an etymology based on the Roman god Janus. Chapter three gives an etymology based on the Latin word ianua (‘door’ or ‘portal’). Chapter four seeks to explain why the Latin word for Genoa was different in Jacopo’s time (Ianua) than it was in classical sources (Genua).

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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C. E. Beneš

Genoa's prestigious ancient origin and founding principles, integrating the city's history into the universal narrative of Creation and the ancient world: a refugee from the Trojan War is one of the founders of Genoa, and the city takes part in the Second Punic War as an ally of Rome. This material was mostly ignored by the GA : Caffaro started the annals in 1099 in medias res with the Genoese expedition to Caesarea during the First Crusade

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

. 3e. Commission to enclose Christine Holby, 1447 The longest of the documents in this section, and the most involved enquiry, was prompted by an unusual case. When Christine Holby, a refugee from the priory of Kildare in war-torn Ireland, turned up in Exeter declaring her intention to become an anchorite, the bishop, Edmund Lacy, had more than the usual range of questions to consider. As well as satisfying

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Rachel Stone and Charles West

This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
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Trevor Dean

heretical groups in Milan, Verona, Florence and Orvieto, but there were active groups in many other centres (Vicenza, Treviso, Ferrara, Cremona, Piacenza, Rimini, Viterbo). The presence of Cathar heretics in the first half of the thirteenth century was favoured by local political conflict, which weakened communal government, and by an influx of refugee heretics from southern France. The ideal of apostolic

in The towns of Italy in the later Middle Ages
Simon Barton and Richard Fletcher

Islam. Others abandoned their homeland and departed to make new lives for themselves under Christian rulers elsewhere. Some of these refugees sought asylum in distant places beyond the Pyrenees. Others remained within the peninsula, finding refuge on its northern fringes. Up in the north-west, from the Basque country of the western Pyrenees along the Cantabrian coast to Galicia and the Atlantic, the Arab

in The world of El Cid
Paul Fouracre and Richard A. Gerberding

his monstrous power, Ebroin was slain by the nobleman Ermenfred, who, with the mighty tyrant prostrate, fled to Pippin. 131 And since the cause of the homicide which he had perpetrated was understood, he was received by him [Pippin] with his usual faithfulness, and by the law of humanity he was honourably joined to the other refugees. Since Ebroin had died, King Theuderic established Waratto, 132 an energetic man of

in Late Merovingian France
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Alison K. McHardy

relatives then claimed the duchy, his half-brother John de Montfort and his niece Joan de Penthièvre. In the ensuing civil war both sides appealed for, and received, outside help: John turned to Edward III, while Joan was supported by Philip VI of France whose nephew, Charles de Blois, she had married. In 1345 Montfort died leaving his wife and young son as refugees in England, and Edward III, as the boy

in The reign of Richard II
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Janet L. Nelson

September 866, Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims quoted from the 859 annal of the AB , and stated explicitly that the work’s author was Prudentius. Of Spanish origin (his given name was Galindo), Prudentius was probably the son of refugee parents who had moved north of the Pyrenees early in Louis the Pious’s reign. The boy was apparently sent to the palace c . 820 to serve in due course in Louis’s chapel

in The Annals of St-Bertin
Alison K. McHardy

his kingdom was invaded by the Turks, Leo V (1373–93) was a refugee whose aim in attempting to make peace between France and England was to organise a crusade to recover Armenia. King Leo was said to have ‘little skill in Latin or fluency in French’, which might seem to disqualify him as a diplomat, but was also ‘a prince of great vivacity and clear vision’, 63 so probably Richard found his

in The reign of Richard II