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Author: Roger Forshaw

This volume discusses the history, culture and social conditions of one of the less well-known periods of ancient Egypt, the Saite or 26th Dynasty (664–525 BC). In the 660s BC Egypt was a politically fragmented and occupied country. This is an account of how Psamtek I, a local ruler from Sais in northern Egypt, declared independence from its overlord, the Assyrian Empire, and within ten years brought about the reunification of the country after almost four hundred years of disunity and periods of foreign domination. Over the next century and a half, the Saite rulers were able to achieve stability and preserve Egypt’s independence as a sovereign state against powerful foreign adversaries. Central government was established, a complex financial administration was developed and Egypt’s military forces were reorganised. The Saites successfully promoted foreign trade, peoples from different countries settled in Egypt and Egypt recovered a prominent role in the Mediterranean world. There were innovations in culture, religion and technology, and Egypt became prosperous. This era was a high-achieving one and is often neglected in the literature devoted to ancient Egypt. Egypt of the Saite Pharaohs, 664–525 BC reveals the dynamic nature of the period, the astuteness of the Saite rulers and their considerable achievements in the political, economic, administrative and cultural spheres.

Art, process, archaeology

This book presents a study of material images and asks how an appreciation of the making and unfolding of images and art alters archaeological accounts of prehistoric and historic societies. With contributions focusing on case studies including prehistoric Britain, Scandinavia, Iberia, the Americas and Dynastic Egypt, and including contemporary reflections on material images, it makes a novel contribution to ongoing debates relating to archaeological art and images. The book offers a New Materialist analysis of archaeological imagery, with an emphasis on considering the material character of images and their making and unfolding. The book reassesses the predominantly representational paradigm of archaeological image analysis and argues for the importance of considering the ontology of images. It considers images as processes or events and introduces the verb ‘imaging’ to underline the point that images are conditions of possibility that draw together differing aspects of the world. The book is divided into three sections: ‘Emergent images’, which focuses on practices of making; ‘Images as process’, which examines the making and role of images in prehistoric societies; and ‘Unfolding images’, which focuses on how images change as they are made and circulated. The book features contributions from archaeologists, Egyptologists, anthropologists and artists. The contributors to the book highlight the multiple role of images in prehistoric and historic societies, demonstrating that archaeologists need to recognise the dynamic and changeable character of images.

Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

expectations and expressions of gender identity (Reay, 1998 ). Modern Australian, Welsh, Scottish, Irish, English or American societies all have subtly, and not so subtly, different approaches to the body, family, marriage, childbirth, social class, gender and age or education, based on wider cultural contexts like history, religion or law. Most importantly there is not in fact a single approach to these ideas in any of the places described. Indeed, your own attitude to family, for example, might depend on your past, your background and, importantly, the regional or class

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Essam El Saeed

”‘, in A. B. Lloyd (ed.), Studies in Pharaonic Religion and Society in Honour of J. Gwyn Griffiths (London: Egypt Exploration Society), 137–45. Allen, J. P. (2005), The Art of Medicine in Ancient Egypt (New York and New Haven: Metropolitan Museum of Art and Yale University Press). Allen, J. P. (2013), ‘The name of Osiris (and Isis),’ Lingua Aegyptia 21, 9–14. Altenmüller, H. (1995), ‘Der Sockel einer Horusstele des Vorstehers der Wab-Priester der Sachmet Benitehhor’, Studien zur Altägyptischen Kultur 22, 1–20. Andrews, C. (1994), Amulets of Ancient Egypt (London

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
The permeable clusters of Hanna Rydh
Elisabeth Arwill-Nordbladh

archaeologist specialising in Asian religion as well as Celtic and Germanic prehistory and early history. Hubert also gave lectures in primitive European religion at the École Pratique des Hautes Études and in national archaeology at the École du Louvre. In the 1890s Hubert met Marcel Mauss, who introduced him to the ideas of Émile Durkheim, Mauss’ uncle. Hubert and Mauss became close friends and joined in creative collaborations. They were both deeply engaged in Durkheim’s project the periodical L’Année Sociologique (Mauss, 1983: 149; Isambert, 1983: 154; Schnapp, 1996: 59

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

religion, ideology, and capital. True, beautiful, and good – or, conversely, false, ugly, and evil – and in both instances the triad’s categorisation remains relevant. For there is not necessarily such a great distance between motives, justifications, and values on the one hand and the criticised practice on the other. That which is now criticised as abuse might have been perceived as useful in its time or its place. And that which is seen as useful today may be regarded as abuse in the future. The concepts of criticism and crisis are related, their Greek roots being

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

factors as local and regional politics, religion, family and wealth. Material and social things like dress, weapons, wealth, children and the past were reflections of that contemporary attitude. This complexity is hard to see in the archaeological record, because individual approaches to life course, gender or status cannot capture that relational Zeitgeist . It is vital therefore that this study proposes a holistic approach, creating a relational mortuary archaeology in which the spatial location of a grave was as important as the chronological date, the objects and

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

, strengthen, weaken, maintain, change, or discuss identities. Finally, heritage is increasing as a separate field of research and teaching. When it comes to World Heritage, there is, in principle, global consensus. The basis for this claim is that since 1972, no less than 193 states have ratified the UNESCO Convention, while the United Nations (UN) has precisely 193 member states ( whc.unesco.org/en/statesparties ; www.un.org/en/member-states/index.html ; September 2020; Appendix 2). Across all variations with regard to history, culture, language, religion, politics, and

in Heritopia
Campbell Price

pleasure to offer this study to someone who has done so much to promote the museum and attempts to understand its contents.1 The so-called ‘healing’ statues form a relatively small but well-studied category of monuments attested chiefly from between the 26th Dynasty and early Ptolemaic Period. They represent men of elite status and generally derive from Delta sites (Kákosy 1999; Sternberg el-Hotabi 1999: 99–112).2 Although the statues are widely cited in discussions of Egyptian religion (e.g. David 2002: 313),   1 This is a revised version of a paper presented during a

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Roger Forshaw

descendants embraced Egyptian names and Egyptian religion.2 Foreign peoples were absorbed into Egyptian culture as they had been through the long history of Pharaonic civilisation. The Egyptian afterlife was open to all, and anyone who could afford could be mummified and be depicted with the Egyptian gods of the afterlife and yet still retain their own visual identity and name. Egyptian culture and religion were to inspire other nations, as attested by the numerous bronze statuettes found in the sanctuary of Hera on Samos and the saite era in the development of Greek

in Egypt of the Saite pharaohs, 664–525 BC