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Puritans, Quakers and Methodists
Alison Hulme

asserts that the relationship between Puritan theology and the economic and social context of the time led to the promotion of a religion of despair (1991). Indeed, it is with the economic considerations, as opposed to the atmosphere of asceticism, that it becomes easier to understand the all-​prevailing presence of thrift in Puritan thinking and living. Puritan economic ethics were born of a powerful combination of individual moral striving and a collective project of mutual aid and social reform, backed by a robust religious and civil institutional context –​not least

in A brief history of thrift
Bill Dunn

quarters, without knowledge of their religion, language, or customs, bearing coined wealth upon his person, and would consider himself greatly aggrieved and much surprised at the least interference. (CWII: 6–7) With hindsight, it is easy to see that this order was already disintegrating. A process of relative economic decline had set in. The dynamism of Britain’s mid-nineteenth-century industrial revolution had given way to much slower growth, even between 1873 and 1896 to what was known at the time as the ‘Great Depression’ (before this term later came to be more

in Keynes and Marx
Abstract only
Bill Dunn

’s conservative conclusions, it does so at the cost of amplifying an idealist elitism. Re-reading Moore’s Principia Ethica in 1906 ‘convinced Maynard all over again that it was “the greatest work on philosophy ever written”’ (Skidelsky 1983 : 173). In 1938 Keynes reaffirms his mature adherence to it ‘fundamental intuitions’ (CWX: 444). His early ‘religion … remains nearer the truth than any other that I know … It was a purer, sweeter air by far than Freud cum Marx. It is still my religion under the surface’ (CWX: 442). This memoir has been questioned as an accurate

in Keynes and Marx
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Ariane Agunsoye, Michelle Groenewald, and Danielle Guizzo

act according to their subjective knowledge and preferences exhibit changeable behaviour have group identities (race, ethnicity, gender, caste, sexuality, religion) exhibit gendered behaviour

in Reclaiming economics for future generations
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Frugality, de-growth and Voluntary Simplicity
Alison Hulme

point whilst protecting –​by political means –​an infrastructure in which technology and tools are useful first and foremost to create practical values’ (Illich, 1977:87–​88). Interestingly, Latouche makes the argument that the economy is a religion, saying ‘when we say that … one should speak about a-​growth the same way that one speaks about atheism, it means precisely that; to become atheists of growth and the economy’ (2010a:521). This is particularly interesting in historical context. Worship of the economy now can usefully be compared to worship of God in

in A brief history of thrift

show up. Structural inequalities need systemic change, change that filters through every level of the system, otherwise we risk reproducing and deepening them. White and male supremacy are not the only hierarchies embedded in our economies, many of which are stratified along lines which include caste, religion, tribe or nationality. This structural focus does not absolve us of

in Reclaiming economics for future generations
Richard R. Nelson

child raising, or from dealing with crime, or from supporting art or religion, or from political campaigning, for that matter. Rather, economics should be viewed as an aspect of any activity. From that point of view, it should be clear that the problem of economic organisation and governance is not simply about the production and distribution of commodities like peanut butter. In any case, under standard circumstances, child care is presumed to be the province of the child’s parents or extended family. At the same time, parents or those in a parental role are presumed

in Market relations and the competitive process
Abstract only
Bill Dunn

terms of its affront to the king and established religion, a language uncongenial to Keynes. There is, however, a more serious argument about action and its consequences which Keynes would consistently endorse. Burke ( 1955 ) argues that current suffering cannot be justified by uncertain future gains. Contrasting the horrors of the French Revolution with Greek tragedy, Burke writes of ‘a principal actor weighing … in the scales hung in a shop of horrors – so much actual crime against so much contingent advantage’ (Burke 1955 : 92). Anticipating the arguments of

in Keynes and Marx
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Myth in the political sphere
Jack Mosse

religions, and they sit in certain areas and they hold certain world views, and it's quite interesting how rigidly people stick to those … for example we have youth rates and we have a consultation every year with different organisations. And the National Union of Students are very critical of the youth rates, as a number of youth groups are. They say they're unfair and they say there's no evidence that young people are less productive and that this is just bias and prejudices against young people. So … our chief economist will just say; ‘this is absolute nonsense!’ And

in The pound and the fury
Ariane Agunsoye, Michelle Groenewald, Danielle Guizzo, and Bruno Roberts- Dear

deprivation is correlated with a racialised identity, caste, tribe or religion then certain groups in society will be more excluded from accessing higher education. In some countries, governments have increased fees and/or reduced the level of financial support they offer in recent years, making it more difficult for young people from historically excluded backgrounds to attend

in Reclaiming economics for future generations