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What the humanities and social sciences can contribute to laboratory animal science and welfare
Series: Inscriptions

Animal research is part of a complex web of relations made up of humans and animals, practices inside and outside the laboratory, formal laws and professional norms, and social imaginaries of the past and future of medicine. Researching Animal Research sets out an innovative approach for understanding and intervening in the social practices that constitute animal research. It proposes the idea of the animal research nexus to draw attention to the connections that make up animal research today and to understand how these elements have become entangled over time. The authors examine moves towards openness, inclusion, and interdisciplinarity in science, and open up questions that move debates beyond polarised pro- and anti-public positions. The book is written as a collaboration and conversation between historians, geographers, sociologists, anthropologists, science and technology studies scholars, and engagement professionals, with commentaries from the arts, social sciences, and animal research sector. Through detailed qualitative analysis of regulation, care, expertise, and public engagement the book offers an unparalleled picture of the changing cultures, practices, and policies of UK animal research. By incorporating critical commentaries and examples of creative practices, it also seeks to animate and potentially transform the animal research nexus that it describes. As the social imaginaries and regulations around animal research continue to change in the UK and beyond, this book is a vital interdisciplinary contribution to the search for new ways to conduct and research animal research today.

Open Access (free)
Emotions and research
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

Living Research Two: Emotions and research Operation Vaken's posters, newspaper adverts, immigration surgeries and mobile billboards were a dramatic display, designed to reassure some citizens that the government was ‘getting tough’ on irregular immigration. However, the campaign also increased worries and anxiety. The survey carried out for us by Ipsos MORI of a nationally representative sample of 2,424 people (for

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Ethics in uncomfortable research situations
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

Living Research Four: Ethics in uncomfortable research situations The ethical bottom line for sociologists is, ‘first, do no harm’. This can mean taking care that how we present our research does not add to raced, classed and gendered oppressions, and equally, avoiding a well-meaning shrug and a response of ‘It's complicated’. At its best, sociology takes seriously the personal, everyday struggles and inconsistencies of

in Go home?
A tale of two professors
Randee Lipson Lawrence
and
Patricia Cranton

6 Mentoring arts-based research: a tale of two professors Randee Lipson Lawrence and Patricia Cranton A rts-based research has tremendous potential to foster human creativity and bring about cultural and social change. Unfortunately, in our experience, graduate programmes in mainstream academic cultures may not always seek to foster creativity. Bringing the arts into graduate adult education research has the potential to breathe new life into what has become a fixed and often rather dull process. This chapter discusses this practice as it critiques and

in Lifelong learning, the arts and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university
Open Access (free)
Why are we doing this? Public sociology and public life
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

Living Research One: Why are we doing this? Public sociology and public life This short section is a conversation between an activist involved in the project 1 and a member of the research team. Each reflects candidly on the value of the MIC project to civil society and on social research (and socially engaged research) in general as a ‘public good

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Migration research and the media
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

Living Research Three: Migration research and the media One of the motivations for our project was to use research to intervene in public debates on immigration by providing alternative perspectives on what is often a polarised and entrenched debate where the perspectives of migrants and racially minoritised communities barely feature (Conlan, 2014 ; Migrant Voice, 2014 ) and where, as we found

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Collaborations
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

Living Research Six: Collaborations Our research on Operation Vaken was rooted in several different forms of engagement, with the hope not only of intervening in social injustices (see Passy, 2001 ) but also of producing knowledge differently; a less elitist and collaborative knowledge. The root of the word collaboration, from the Latin collaborare – to work together – carries ambivalence. To collaborate can also suggest betrayal, even

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Public anger in research (and social media)
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

Living Research Five: Public anger in research (and social media) At our end-of-project conference, one participant said that the event had made her think that ‘when outraged by something’ she would try to research it; ‘combine activism with academia and your sociological imagination’. Strikingly, this comment captured much of what brought us together to develop the research discussed in this book. In this section, we

in Go home?
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

As mentioned in the introduction, the empirical analyses presented in this book are based on the material gathered in my research conducted in 2014–2015 within the Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship SAST. In total, 80 individual in-depth interviews and questionnaires were undertaken with 40 post-accession Polish migrants in the UK and 40 post-2004 Ukrainian migrants to Poland legally residing there (see the Appendix, Tables 1 and 2 ). The participants needed to meet a selection criterion of not having a local spouse or life partner, to

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Nicole Vitellone

3 Condoms and sex research What are the consequences of getting adolescents to speak about the condom and their sexual experiences in the public arena? What impact has sex research had in producing knowledge of adolescent sexuality? In answering these questions this chapter seeks to provide a history of sex research on the condom. The object of my analysis is government-funded sex research on adolescence. Focusing on HIV/AIDS research conducted within university departments throughout the 1990s, I address the role social scientists have played in constructing

in Object matters