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Abstract only
Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

research, particularly on finance and foreign relations, still remains to be done before a full-scale history of the reign can be written’. 9 This situation to large degree still holds true and there is much work still to be done on the medieval exchequer and its development into the early fourteenth century. 10 In this volume we offer examples of correspondence reflective of the business of the exchequer

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
Abstract only
Wendy R. Childs
and
Phillipp R. Schofield

. 28 With additional reference to a more recent edition and translation of the Declaration, based upon the earlier editions of Sir James Fergusson and A. A. M. Duncan and published online by National Records of Scotland. www.nrscotland.gov.uk/files//research/declaration-of-arbroath/declaration-of-arbroath-transcription-and-translation.pdf (last accessed 19 April 2022

in The reign of Edward II, 1307–27
Editor:

This book provides the first English translation of the Chronicle of the city of Genoa by the thirteenth-century Dominican Jacopo da Varagine (also known as Jacobus de Voragine). While Jacopo is better known for his monumental compilation of saints’ lives, the Golden legend, his lesser known Chronicle of Genoa exemplifies the important medieval genre of the civic chronicle. The work mixes scholarly research about the city’s origins with narrative accounts based on Genoese archival sources, more didactic and moral reflections on the proper conduct of public and private life, and personal accounts of Jacopo’s own experience as archbishop of Genoa from 1292 until his death in 1298. Divided into twelve parts, the work covers the history of Genoa from its ancient origins up to Jacopo’s own day. Jacopo’s first-hand accounts of events in which he himself participated—such as the great civic reconciliation of 1295, over which he himself presided—provide a valuable contrast to the more scholarly and didactic sections of the work. Together they form an integrated, coherent approach to urban history, which illustrates some of the most important styles of historiography in the Middle Ages.

Abstract only
E.A. Jones

must be substantially higher. Where further research has been done on a particular locality or region, Clay’s totals have been exceeded by at least fifty per cent. For her 1985 study of anchorites in England, Ann Warren identifed 780 enclosed solitaries at 601 sites between 1100 and the end of the Middle Ages, again mostly from printed sources. 15 Comparable research on unenclosed hermits is still to be done, but there is no reason to doubt that it

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Cambridge edited by J.P.C. Roach (London: Oxford University Press for the Institute of Historical Research, 1959), p. 114. 25 Alison McCann, ‘The Chapel of St. Cyriac, Chichester’, Sussex Archaeological Collections 113 (1975), pp. 197–9. 26 St Richard Wych (d. 1253

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

R.W. Dunning, ed., A History of the County of Somerset: Vol. 3 (London: Oxford University Press for the Institute of Historical Research, 1974), pp. 61–71. 22 Noted in Calendar of the Register of John De Drokensford, Bishop of Bath and Wells, A.D. 1309–1329 , edited by E. Hobhouse, Somerset Record Society 1 (1887), p. 284

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
E.A. Jones

spent the remaining forty years of his life in retirement at Hindlip, researching and writing a compendious history of Worcestershire that remains one of the most important sources for the history and topography of the county. 53 (i) is modernised from Thomas Habington’s A Survey of Worcestershire , edited by John Amphlett, 2 vols, Worcestershire Historical Society 1–2 (1895–99), Vol. 2, pp. 17–18. (ii

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

Polychronicon Ranulphi Higden monachi Cestrensis: Vol. 7 edited by Joseph Rawson Lumby, Rolls Series (London: Longman & Co., 1879), p. 245. 31 ‘Religious Houses: Introduction’ in A History of the County of Chester: Vol. 3 edited by B.E. Harris (London: Oxford University Press for the Institute of Historical Research, 1980), p. 127. The

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

a narrative accessible to non-academics. Little other research focused on Jacopo until the late 1990s, when Stefania Bertini Guidetti published an Italian translation of the chronicle ( CCG ) followed by an important series of studies. 11 Since then Giovanni Paolo Maggioni, who began by working on the GL , has shifted focus to Jacopo's sermons, with published editions and an extensive website providing both

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

: Borthwick Institute of Historical Research, 1981), p. 34. 30 Richard Scrope, archbishop of York 1398–1405. 31 Edmund Lacy, bishop of Exeter 1420–1455. The precentor was the cathedral choir-master, though by the late Middle Ages it was more of an honorary appointment

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550