Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 504 items for :

  • Manchester Religious Studies x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Peter Murray
and
Maria Feeney

173 6 Social research and state planning Introduction The First Programme for Economic Expansion was launched in 1958. By the early 1960s the scope of programming was widening as the stagnation prevailing for most of the 1950s gave way to a period of continuous economic growth. Initial crisis conditions had enabled increased social spending to be left off the programmers’ agenda. The changed politics of increasing prosperity, as well as their own expanding ambitions, meant that this could no longer be sustained. This chapter begins by sketching Ireland’s social

in Church, state and social science in Ireland
Peter Murray
and
Maria Feeney

139 5 The institutionalisation of Irish social research Introduction The injection of resources into Ireland’s scientific research infrastructure at the end of the 1950s created two new social science research producers –​the Rural Economy Division of An Foras Taluntais and the ERI. In the former rural sociology took a recognised place alongside a variety of other agriculture-​relevant disciplines. In the latter, as exemplified by the letter sent by SSISI to the Ford Foundation on 20 August 1959, the distinction between the economic and the social was from the

in Church, state and social science in Ireland
Christopher Tyerman

5 Scholarship, politics and the ‘golden age’ of research A generation after Michaud’s death, the creation of an academic society devoted to crusade studies, La Société de l’Orient Latin, bore witness to a transformation of the subject. Founded by the wealthy gentleman scholar Paul Riant (1835–88), the Society produced two initial volumes of research materials, the Archives de l’Orient Latin, in 1881 and 1884 as well as later sponsoring publication of texts and producing a regular if short-lived Revue de l’Orient Latin (12 volumes, 1893–1911). Contributors to

in The Debate on the Crusades
Peter Murray
and
Maria Feeney

105 4 US aid and the creation of an Irish scientific research infrastructure Introduction This chapter broadens out the focus from Irish sociology to examine Irish scientific research. Its central theme is the way in which resources provided or jointly controlled by US actors underpinned the development of a modern scientific research infrastructure within the state in the period after the Second World War. The scientific fields principally affected by these financial injections were applied research related to agriculture, industry and economics. Money flowed

in Church, state and social science in Ireland
Knowledge institutions and the rebalancing of power, 1937– 73
Authors: and

From British rule the independent Irish state inherited an effectively denominational system of university education and a complementary set of science and arts institutions. Under independent rule denominational influence increased and resource starvation prevailed until the end of the 1950s. Then, as the formation of human capital, education began to be treated as an input into economic growth and American initiatives stimulated new research activity. These changes played a vital role in the rebalancing of power between the Catholic Church and the state. Social science, where the Catholic Church had been a monopoly provider, supplies a dramatic case study of the interlinking of this power shift with the process of knowledge generation.

A study of the Christian Social movement

Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites engages with and challenges some key narratives of one of the darkest periods in the history of Vienna; the rise and sustained presence of organised, politically directed antisemitism in the city between the late nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth. Sketching out first the longer-term background, it then focuses on central players in the antisemitic Christian Social movement, which flourished through an ideology of exclusion and prejudice. The work is built on considerable original research into both bourgeois social organisations and activists from the lower clergy, but it also exposes the role played in the development of antisemitism by the senior clergy in Vienna. In addition to a close examination of the antisemitic aspects of the Christian Socials, it analyses how other major social debates in this period impacted on their development as a group: national struggles, especially the desire for German unification; responses to the waves of poverty and social unrest that swept over Europe; and conservative and clerical reactions to modernity, such as liberalism and democracy – debates with a resonance far beyond Vienna. Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites tells its story across this long period, and for the first time in such detail, to give room to the gestation in ‘respectable’ society of antisemitism, an ideology that seemed to be dying in the 1860s, but which was revived and given new strength from the 1880s onwards, even surviving challenges from the more widely known Red Vienna of the 1920s and 1930s.

Abstract only
,

damage caused by a terrorist bomb which exploded nearby in 1996. Manchester Cathedral is one of the most rewarding and significant medieval buildings in the region, reflecting the ambitions and achievements of aristocratic and mercantile patrons in national, rather than merely local, contexts. The survival of the original domestic building of the College is remarkable, while the architectural, stylistic, and artistic influences and connections are worthy subjects for further research. In addition, the story of

in Manchester Cathedral
,

Durham, who would also be one of the co-founders of Manchester College. 17 Bishop Langley served as Bishop of Durham from 1406 to 1436, a key figure in the north of England, securing Lancastrian authority in a region which had seen two serious uprisings in 1403 and 1405. His involvement alone shows the significance of the new foundation in Manchester. Fifteenth-century religion was once assumed by historians to have been moribund and unpopular. More recent research has uncovered a church which was, by contrast

in Manchester Cathedral
Abstract only
Michael Carter-Sinclair

interconnected purposes. The first is to present, in a broadly chronological manner, a history of the Christian Social movement, using the results of research undertaken in a number of archives, libraries and similar institutions. This research has covered the fifty or so years of the existence of the movement, from the late 1880s to the mid-1930s, when changes in political circumstances meant that many of the component parts of the movement were either subsumed into other organisations or disbanded. However, since Christian Socials frequently justified the existence, and the

in Vienna’s ‘respectable’ antisemites
Writing the history of Manchester’s Collegiate Church and Cathedral
,

Manchester of Christ’s College, Chetham’s and the Free Grammar School (3 vols, 1828–33), which had a team of distinguished engravers and illustrators. 23 The publishers’ preface to this major enterprise emphasized the importance of researching the benefits these institutions had brought to Manchester and (in a way which seems to have been in part a fundraising campaign) aimed ‘to perpetuate the names of Founders and Benefactors, to enumerate their useful labours, to specify their munificent grants, and to describe the

in Manchester Cathedral