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Selected Essays of Anne Lake Prescott

For fifty years Anne Lake Prescott has been a central force in the study of Anglo-French literary relations in the early modern period. This selection of her essays connects issues of nation, language, religion, and gender. The twelve collected here examine early modern culture by describing and often by contrasting its texts. The essays borrow eclectically from different interpretative practices – archival research, historical placement, psychoanalysis, biblical commentary, translation, and the study of gender. Throughout they illuminate by clarifying what she calls the ‘cultural forcefield surrounding and sustaining’ the poems. The readings cross boundaries. They consider the Reformation as it affects ideas of poetic vocation and the sense of time, and show how the biblical David became a model for Renaissance poets and also for slandered courtiers. Several essays deal with Edmund Spenser’s epic and his sonnet sequence, and many bring texts from other fields to illuminate Donne, Ronsard, the Sidneys and other early modern writers. Three little-known French poems with lesbian speakers illuminate Donne’s ‘Sappho to Philaenis’, while the language of ruin in Mary Sidney’s psalm translations suggests paradoxically her sense of religious renewal. These essays – penetrating, generous, and witty – use close reading to consider large cultural issues. An introduction by Ayesha Ramachandran, Susan Felch, and Susannah Monta places Anne’s work in the context of early modern studies and the book ends with short appreciations of Anne as collaborator and editor by Roger Kuin and William Oram and a bibliography of Prescott’s work.

The New Arcadia, Second Revised Edition

The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia, Sir Philip Sidney’s prose romance about the pastoral exploits of the princes Musidorus and Pyrocles (aka Zelmane the amazon) remains one of the defining works of English fiction. The New Arcadia – the revised, unfinished version first published in print in 1590 – differs from its more widely known cousin the Old Arcadia, which circulated in manuscript during Sidney’s lifetime, in two major points. The first of these is its ambitious, non-chronological approach to the narrative, resulting in crucial plot details (and even the true identities of the main protagonists) being initially withheld from the reader. The second difference is in the New Arcadia’s rhetorically elaborate style, which consolidated Sidney’s reputation most skilled prose stylists of the English Renaissance. This edition of the New Arcadia is the first in 37 years and combines the text of Victor Skretkowicz’s seminal 1987 edition with a substantially expanded commentary and additional long notes on the book’s history in print and Sidney’s use of rhetorical devices.

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Anne as co-author and editor
Roger Kuin
and
William Oram

The joy of partnership Roger Kuin Over a period of twenty-some years, I have had the privilege not only of knowing Anne Prescott but of occasionally collaborating with her on articles. 1 Anyone who has worked on joint scholarly projects knows that while division of labor is comparatively easy in the research phase, to write with two pens is a perilous exercise. The first of our essays à deux concerned a friend of Sir Philip Sidney's, the polymath

in David, Donne, and Thirsty Deer
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An introduction
Ayesha Ramachandran
,
Susan Felch
, and
Susannah Monta

varied, wide-ranging research. Moreover, the confessional wars of theory and historicisms in the 1990s, particularly as they manifested themselves in early modern studies, offered no obvious critical location for Prescott's capacious, cross-cultural, multilingual, and theoretically eclectic approach to early modern texts, particularly poetry. This volume aims to redress this critical lacuna. It collects twelve of Prescott's hard-to-find essays and places them within a critical history of early modern literary and cultural studies in the nearly four

in David, Donne, and Thirsty Deer
Space and desire in Colonna, ‘Rabelais’, and Middleton’s Game at Chess
Anne Lake Prescott

Middleton, whether he needed protection (few that summer were pro-Spanish, and it may be that what disturbed James was the impudence of representing him on the public stage), whether the last-minute topical allusions distract us from more basic allegory about good and evil, whether the white side escapes Middleton's irony. On such issues I have found particularly useful: T. H. Howard-Hill, ‘The Origins of Middleton's A Game at Chess ’, Research Opportunities in Renaissance Drama 28 (1985): 3–14; Paul Yachnin, ‘ A Game at Chess: Thomas Middleton's “Praise of Folly

in David, Donne, and Thirsty Deer
Ronsard’s conceits meet Donne’s
Anne Lake Prescott
and
Roger Kuin

glimmer.’). These useful lexicographical facts support the impressive arguments and warnings given by Alexander Parker in his 1982 Presidential Address to the Modern Humanities Research Association. Before turning to the Spanish Baroque texts that were the subject of his inquiry, he discussed the concept, and the term, of ‘conceit’. ‘In literary history and criticism English has two terms which cannot be translated by a single word in the languages of Western Europe. The first is “romance” as distinct from “novel”; the second is “conceit” as distinct

in David, Donne, and Thirsty Deer
Some contexts for Amoretti 67–70
Anne Lake Prescott

. Acknowledgement I would like to thank A. Kent Hieatt for reminding me of several deer I had forgotten, Edmée de M. Schless for advice on French hunting terminology, Edward W. Tayler for thoughts on the significance of ‘ tempestiva ’, and my research assistant Anne Himmelfarb for more help with German than I enjoy admitting. Notes 1 Petrarch, ed. Alessandro Vellutello (Venice, 1568), sig. P7, and G. A

in David, Donne, and Thirsty Deer
Darren Freebury- Jones

he first argued for Shakespeare’s hand in some of the play’s central scenes. In his essay ‘New Research on the Dramatic Canon of Thomas Kyd’, Jackson aimed ‘to demonstrate the inadequacy of Vickers’s case for expanding the dramatic canon of Thomas Kyd’ ( 2008 : 119). Jackson detected more unique three-word sequences of the period 1580–96 between

in Shakespeare’s tutor
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Nocturnal scenes and unsound effects
Laura Jayne Wright

guarantee of tracing sound through the playhouse. In their research on hautboys in Antony and Cleopatra , discussed in this book's Introduction, Will Tosh, Simon Smith, and Claire Van Kampen confirmed that, when performed at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, the ‘origin of the sound was not immediately apparent, as the wooden interior of the playhouse worked like a resonating chamber to diffuse the sound through the house, creating an appropriately eerie musical effect’. 37 Even sitting in the playhouse, with the gallery in

in Sound effects
Darren Freebury- Jones

Taylor’s analysis offers opportunities for researchers to investigate further instances of parodia and imitatio between these two writers and close associates. Although the meaningless fragments of words such as ‘hours the’ that Taylor claims as evidence give no reliable indication of imitation, let alone authorship, further research might unearth genuine correspondences that will serve to broaden

in Shakespeare’s tutor