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Saurabh Mishra

the late nineteenth century, significant investments into burgeoning new fields such as bacteriology? This certainly seems to be the case if we look at laboratories such as the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in South Africa, which spearheaded cutting-edge research that set the agenda for metropolitan organisations. 1 We need to ask whether the research carried out at institutes in India, such as the

in Beastly encounters of the Raj
Sabine Clarke

In 1941 the Colonial Office made a commitment to fund scientific research into the chemistry of sugar. If sugar cane could be used to make plastics, building materials, drugs and other synthetic products, then it was hoped the British West Indies would find themselves in the fortunate position of being producers of a lucrative raw material for the chemical industry rather than a low-value foodstuff. This was a vision that endowed laboratory research with the power to transform the economic and social life of the British West Indies. But how

in Science at the end of empire
Sabine Clarke

During the 1940s the scientists engaged by the Colonial Office were generally able to undertake projects of fundamental research in the chemistry of tropical products along lines of their own choosing. The notion that scientific researchers required the freedom to select their own research problems was a principle upheld by the CPRC and also officials at the Colonial Office concerned with the operation of the CDW Acts. By the early 1950s, however, officials at the Colonial Office were concerned that the work overseen by the CPRC was not

in Science at the end of empire
Bahá’ís, Muslims, Jews and the British state, 1900–20

With the outbreak of the First World War and British expansion into the Middle East, certain Bahá’í, Muslim and Jewish leaders found it necessary to form new relationships with the British government and its representatives, relationships which would prove to be of pivotal importance for each and have a lasting impact on future generations. This book, based upon extensive archival research, explores how Bahá’ís in England and Palestine, Muslim missionaries from India based in Woking and Jews in England on both sides of the Zionist debate understood interactions with the British state and larger imperial culture prior to and during the war. One of the most significant findings of this study is that while an appreciation of diversity tends to be regarded as a modern, postcolonial phenomenon, a way to remedy the unjust remnants of an imperial past, the men and women of the early twentieth century whose words and actions come to life of the pages of this book understood diversity as a defining characteristic of the empire itself. They found real meaning and value in the variety of religions, races, languages, nations, cultures and ethnicities that comprised that vast, global entity. This recognition of its diversity, along with certain British liberal ideals, allowed extraordinary individuals to find common ground between that state and their own beliefs, goals and aspirations, thus helping to lay the foundation for the eventual development of the Bahá’í Faith as a world religion, a new era of Muslim missionary activity in the West and a Jewish state in Palestine.

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Children, missions, empire and emotions
Hugh Morrison

mingled with a mix of Ma-ori culture and Christian spirituality to create a sense of meaningful adult identity. 13 This book engages with these complexities by expanding the historical and conceptual parameters, to advance scholarship in what is still arguably an underdeveloped category of historical research. We now know quite a lot about discrete groups of missionary children in particular periods and

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Hugh Morrison

played out in educational practice and civic policies. 96 Likewise, missionary children in the institutional narrative became more clearly obvious in their own right, both on the pages of newspapers, magazines or denominational reports and in university research theses that reflected the changing intellectual milieu. Although mostly American in provenance, such was the nature of Protestant missions that

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Abstract only
Hugh Morrison

and cultural temporal-specificity’ are ‘key concepts’ in a ‘geographically broad approach to the past’. 9 Therefore, I hope that this book might contribute helpfully in both expanding current understanding and, more importantly, identifying fruitful avenues for further research. For missions history, it affirms existing scholarship that highlights the importance of

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Abstract only
Hugh Morrison

roles and relationships. 33 Missionary families reflected these changes, with perhaps middle-class values or expectations having a greater impact as the missionary workforce became increasingly professionalised and better educated. Religion may have been an additional factor for these families. Canadian research for the period 1871–1901, for example, indicates that declining fertility was a

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Missionary children inhabiting literary spaces
Hugh Morrison

always social groups – that have their own particular values, modes of feeling, and ways to express those feelings’. Such communities ‘may be very close in practice to other emotional communities of their time’, but they are not necessarily ‘bounded entities’ and may be defined ‘quite broadly’ within historical research. However, ‘[m]ore narrowly delineated communities allow the

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
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Some comparisons, some reflections
Diane Robinson-Dunn

World War, or any other war for that matter, would assume a prominent place in the study. After all, my original intention was to explore the histories of three religious minorities in England – Bahá’ís, Muslims and Jews – and their ties to the Middle East. Likewise, while the historical characters who emerged from my archival research may have hoped to shape the world and its future, all presented ways of doing so that did not involve military conquest or armed conflict. Yet, despite a general disinclination towards violence

in An empire of many cultures