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Samuel Beckett’s theatrical bodies
Nicholas Taylor-Collins

after its long bondage to false conventions. … Samuel Beckett has pioneered an analogous reform in our own day, trying to revive an art that has rotted in its own pomp by stripping away all theatrical tinsel, so as to get back to the bedrock of reality[.] ( Barish, 1985 : 135–6) Barish

in Shakespeare, memory, and modern Irish literature
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Nicholas Royle

‘versatility’, see Hélène Cixous, ‘The Unforeseeable’, trans. Beverley Bie Brahic, in Volleys of Humanity: Essays 1972–2009 , ed. Eric Prenowitz (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011), 221–40, in particular: ‘[ versatility ] is a word which rings pleasingly in my ears and mind. I could write a book on versatility. Naturally I would call it Versatilities. Those I love the most are versatile’ (235). 9 Samuel Beckett, Happy Days , in The Complete Dramatic Works (London: Faber and Faber, 1986), 146. 10 See Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot , in The

in Hélène Cixous
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Nicholas Taylor-Collins

: Samuel Beckett’s Three Novels (1951–53) and Edna O’Brien’s Country Girls Trilogy (1960–86) . One way into this discussion is through the body’s relation to power. Agamben’s concept of modern sovereignty, and its biopolitical element, is essentially tethered to the body of the citizen. Quoting Foucault, Agamben states

in Shakespeare, memory, and modern Irish literature
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Remembering memory
Nicholas Taylor-Collins

. M. Synge, James Joyce, and John Banville, through embodied memories in Samuel Beckett and Edna O’Brien, to territorial memories in Yeats and Heaney, these writers remember Shakespeare in each case. These texts contribute to the development of a modern national identity and consciousness, and they do so through memories of Shakespeare’s writing. As we now commemorate the birth of modern Ireland, we

in Shakespeare, memory, and modern Irish literature
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Author:

This book provides a lucid, wide-ranging and up-to-date critical introduction to the writings of Hélène Cixous (1937–). Cixous is often considered ‘difficult’. Moreover she is extraordinarily prolific, having published dozens of books, essays, plays and other texts. Royle avoids any pretence of a comprehensive survey, instead offering a rich and diverse sampling. At once expository and playful, original and funny, this micrological approach enables a new critical understanding and appreciation of Cixous’s writing. If there is complexity in her work, Royle suggests, there is also uncanny simplicity and great pleasure. The book focuses on key motifs such as dreams, the supernatural, literature, psychoanalysis, creative writing, realism, sexual differences, laughter, secrets, the ‘Mother unconscious’, drawing, painting, autobiography as ‘double life writing’, unidentifiable literary objects (ULOs), telephones, non-human animals, telepathy and the ‘art of cutting’. Particular stress is given to Cixous’s work in relation to Sigmund Freud and Jacques Derrida, as well as to her importance in the context of ‘English literature’. There are close readings of Shakespeare, Emily Brontë, P. B. Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Lewis Carroll, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, for example, alongside in-depth explorations of her own writings, from Inside (1969) and ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1975) up to the present. Royle’s book will be of particular interest to students and academics coming to Cixous’s work for the first time, but it will also appeal to readers interested in contemporary literature, creative writing, life writing, narrative theory, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, feminism, queer theory, ecology, drawing and painting.

King Lear and the King’s Men
Richard Wilson

imperative Samuel Beckett called ‘the obligation to express’ when there is nothing to be said: The expression that there is nothing to express, nothing with which to express, nothing from which to express, no power to express, no desire to express, together with the obligation to express. 48

in Free Will
Shakespeare in the time of the political
Richard Wilson

Samuel Beckett’s ‘Nothing to be done’. So in Bingo they are ironized when the dramatist dies repeating the question, ‘Was anything done?’ And Bond’s bitter aftertaste is shared by biographers, who are forced to concede that while the battle for Welcombe was a ‘victory for the men, women and children of the borough who rose against a rapacious local grandee’ it was the owner

in Free Will
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Richard Wilson

‘indicts superfluous poverty by undergoing its own, yet indicts this asceticism as well’. King Lear is its author’s profoundest critique of his own Ubu-like ‘abject position’, of the perverse power of weakness, the queer art of failure, and the absolutism of the autonomous artwork, I conclude. For centuries before Samuel Beckett, the famished lessness of King Lear means that here, as Adorno

in Free Will
Taking the measure of Antony and Cleopatra, Royal Shakespeare Company, 1972, 1978, 1982
Carol Chillington Rutter

worked her apotheosis by poetry. Thus Richard Griffiths's Asp Man was like nothing spectators had seen before – not in Antony and Cleopatra anyway, a circus clown straight out of Barnum and Bailey via Samuel Beckett (see 4.5 ). He was dressed in a striped undergarment, a sarong tied around his bulky waist. A hat, shaped in rope like a capsized Egyptian solar ship, covered his ears. His eyes were heavily kohled. And smack in the middle of his hang-dog face was an out-sized nose in bright red plastic. That nose remembered the one stuck on Bottom

in Antony and Cleopatra
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Nicholas Royle

familiar words’ (147). ‘Away’ – ‘in its origin a phrase’, the OED tells us, ‘ON preposition , and we , WAY’, i.e. on (his, one’s) way , ‘on’ (as in ‘move on’), and thus ‘from this (or that) place’. ‘Already in Old English’, says the OED , ‘away’ (‘a-we’) is a couple. It is (as the OED does not go on to say) a coupling, a mating, making love, having it together, having it away. 11 ‘All strange away’, as Samuel Beckett might say. 12 Away also, in what the publishers call his ‘final literary utterance’, ‘What is the word’: ‘what is the word – / there – / over

in Hélène Cixous