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Middle-Aged Syrian Women’s Contributions to Family Livelihoods during Protracted Displacement in Jordan
Dina Sidhva, Ann-Christin Zuntz, Ruba al Akash, Ayat Nashwan, and Areej Al-Majali

at the income-generating activities that our interlocutors engage in during the (literal or perceived) absence of their husbands. The fourth section asks how middle-aged women juggle their economic roles with more traditional duties as matchmakers, grandmothers and mothers-in-law. Methodology and Study Participants This project was funded by the Scottish Funding Council’s (SFC) Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) Internal Pump Priming Fund at the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

in the regulation of the use of bodies and body parts post-mortem. The Coroners and Justice Act 2009 was enacted to reform both the substantive law on the investigation of deaths in England and Wales and to reform the operation of the coroners’ service, a central part of the latter being the creation of the office of Chief Coroner. 5 We noted in the previous chapter that Scotland enacted its own legislation in relation to the removal and uses of human tissue from the dead in the form of the Human Tissue (Scotland) Act 2006. It must also be noted that the system

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

in 2011 30 which combines investigation and, where appropriate, explanation, apology and financial redress. Scotland, where the NHS Redress Act 2006 does not apply, proposes a more radical no-fault scheme. 31 We explore all these proposals later in the chapter. 32 We now turn to the complaints process. Complaints procedures – a troubled history 9.4 A formal NHS complaints system was introduced in 1966. There were three separate schemes relating to primary care, clinical care and non-clinical care respectively. In 1996, 33 new procedures were

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Abstract only
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

Service’ to fast-track research proposals that raise no material ethical issues. And much more radical simplification followed the Academy of Medical Science’s 2011 recommendations for reform. 44 Subsuming the NPSA, a single regulator called the HRA (see 15.3) took on governance and ethical review of all NHS research. A new, integrated version of GAfREC 45 harmonised the requirements of ethical review in England, Scotland and Wales and new Standard Operating Procedures (running to 200 pages) were published in 2015. 46 The future: EU Clinical Trials Regulation 536

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

17.1 This chapter explores legal questions surrounding organ and tissue transplantation. It focuses solely on transplantation. Closely related questions relating to organ retention for the purposes of education and research are dealt with in Chapter 18 . 1 The Human Tissue Act 2004 regulates transplantation in England and Northern Ireland. Scotland has its own statute, the Human Tissue (Scotland) Act 2006 and as we shall see Wales has made a substantial change to the law relating to cadaver transplantation in the Human Transplantation (Wales) Act 2013

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

Appeal 100 and the House of Lords. 101 It seemed, notwithstanding Sidaway , to have become the ‘standard formulation of the duty to disclose information to patients’. 102 In Montgomery before the Court of Session ( sub nom NM v Lanarkshire Health Board ), the Scottish Court of Appeal disagreed and with something close to scorn the court dismissed submissions that Pearce replaced the reasonable doctor test with a reasonable patient test. Sidaway , the Scottish judges said, was binding on the English Court of Appeal, as it was on them. Lord Woolf’s judgment in

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

wife, the traditional principles of the common law suggest that he cannot act against the woman’s wishes. 68 The Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014 69 and the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 70 expressly require doctors and other agencies to notify local authorities where an adult is at risk of abuse. Section 42 of the (English) Care Act 2014 imposes a duty on local authorities to make inquiries where it has a reasonable suspicion that an adult is experiencing or is at risk of abuse or neglect, but the duty does not extend to

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

the cost to the family of raising an unplanned child appeared to be readily endorsed in claims for wrongful conception. Two decisions of the House of Lords restored English and Scottish law to the position declared by Jupp J in Udale , albeit on different grounds. It was held in McFarlane v Tayside Health Board 75 that compensation for the cost of bringing up a healthy child will not be awarded. Such a loss is categorised now as irrecoverable economic loss. McFarlane is difficult to analyse. 76 Five Law Lords rejected the parents’ claim. Five sets of very

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Abstract only
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

requires a different mode of care should not be excluded by the presence of such general guidance. 83 NICE itself put it thus: (H)ealth professionals, when exercising their clinical judgment, should take its guidance fully into account, but … it does not override their responsibility for making appropriate decisions in the circumstances of the individual patient. 84 Diagnosis 7.12 A wrong diagnosis is by itself no evidence of negligence on the part of the doctor. As a Scottish judge said: In the realm of diagnosis and treatment there is ample

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Abstract only
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

book. In May 2015 the Scottish Parliament rejected the Assisted Suicide (Scotland) Bill by eighty-two to thirty-six votes. 134 Margo MacDonald’s first Bill 135 was defeated in 2010. Her 2013 Bill was closely modelled on the Oregon law and aimed to allow those with terminal illness or deteriorating progressive conditions to seek assisted death. Patrick Harvie took up the cause when Margo MacDonald died in 2014. Active euthanasia 19.13 Meyers and Mason 136 envisaged the doctor ‘providing or administering a lethal dose of medication’. But a lethal injection

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)