Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45 items for :

  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
E.A. Jones

hermit’s habit’. The following year, Thomas Dacre, Henry’s leading magnate in the Scottish borders, and full of schemes to destabilise the region to English advantage, wrote to Wolsey recommending that, if he will send him ‘a wise yeoman in hermit’s weed, … he will see more waste done by such means than if the King had laid a garrison of 3,000 men there’. 6 57. A pious Oxfordshire hermit

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
E.A. Jones

great persecutions & horrible troubles, that have been wrought and practised by the Romish prelates, specially in this realm of England and Scotland, from the year of our Lord a thousand, unto the time now present’. Despite its massive size (about 1800 pages in the first edition) the book was popular, and three further, enlarged, editions appeared in Foxe’s lifetime. Despite its obvious bias, it is an important historical

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

unnatural civil wars … By God’s provision our Chester has below the city walls a beautiful and fish-filled river, and a harbour on the south side into which ships arrive from Aquitaine, Spain, Scotland and Germany [with wine and other merchandise]. The waters now give fish to the population and a living to the fishermen… It has two straight and excellent streets which traverse the city in the form of the

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

, whether along the south coast, in north Wales or on the border with Scotland. But the writ quoted here refers also to an intention to benefit trade [ 14 ]. The same document implies the emergence, in the context of multiple ventures of the kind, of specialists in the arts of town foundation. All lords were reviewing their estates and considering their potential for urban development. 8 The monks of Eynsham in Oxfordshire

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

for civic defences as it did in less effectively governed parts of Europe. But although their construction and maintenance was sometimes resented locally as a costly royal imposition, such walls did not have the same functions of local mastery as had the early Anglo-Norman royal castles, and town populations along the south coast or close to the Welsh or Scottish borders had occasion at diverse periods of the Welsh

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Alison K. McHardy

complications to attempts to end the Anglo-French conflict through diplomacy. The oldest of these wars was with Scotland. By 1377 Scots had been fighting the English for eighty years in order to gain and keep their independence, and since 1295 they had been allied with France. The danger of England having to fight a war on two fronts was shown during Edward III’s reign, and became very evident during Richard

in The reign of Richard II
Alison K. McHardy

Shiryngham; John Fitzmartin, 69 clerk; William Chesterton, rector of Rattlesden [Suffolk] , 70 Brother Richard Roughton, Franciscan [friar] , 71 and Thomas his brother, and all those who are overseas with the traitors, or decide to go over to them later … and all those who support our lord king’s enemies of France and Scotland. Provided always that our lord king is answered for money and debts owed

in The reign of Richard II
Abstract only
Anthony Musson and Edward Powell

, gender relations, economic hardship and social dislocation. 23 The kidnap and robbery of Lewis Beaumont, bishop-elect of Durham and two cardinals should be seen in the context of professional and personal rivalries and viewed against the backdrop of war with Scotland and the unsettled political climate of Edward II’s reign. 24 [ 3.1 ] The attack occurred in 1317 on the main

in Crime, Law and Society in the Later Middle Ages
Alison K. McHardy

should be scattered abroad without any profit to yourself; you had better guard and defend your own inheritance, which is invaded on all sides from France and Scotland, than employ your men elsewhere’. The young king was well inclined to follow this advice of the earl, for he loved him with his whole heart, they having been brought up together. 50. The bishop of Lincoln seeks support for the bishop of

in The reign of Richard II
The Norman Conquest
Elisabeth van Houts

houses due to the building of the castle. 22 Not only in towns but in the countryside castles appeared as garrison places for William’s troops. Particularly in the border areas with Wales [51] and with Scotland and along the Channel coast, fortifications were built at, for example, Chepstow, Rhuddlan, York and Durham, and Dover. Also, existing wooden, or sometimes stone

in The Normans in Europe