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María José Sarrabayrouse Oliveira

The military coup of March 1976 in Argentina ruptured the prevailing institutional order, with the greater part of its repressive strategy built on clandestine practices and tactics (death, torture and disappearance) that sowed fear across large swathes of Argentine society. Simultaneously, the terrorist state established a parallel, de facto legal order through which it endeavoured to legitimise its actions. Among other social forces, the judicial branch played a pivotal role in this project of legitimisation. While conscious of the fact that many of those inside the justice system were also targets of oppression, I would like to argue that the dictatorship‘s approach was not to establish a new judicial authority but, rather, to build upon the existing institutional structure, remodelling it to suit its own interests and objectives. Based on an analysis of the criminal and administrative proceedings that together were known as the Case of the judicial morgue, this article aims to examine the ways in which the bodies of the detained-disappeared that entered the morgue during the dictatorship were handled, as well as the rationales and practices of the doctors and other employees who played a part in this process. Finally, it aims to reflect upon the traces left by judicial and administrative bureaucratic structures in relation to the crimes committed by the dictatorship, and on the legal strategies adopted by lawyers and the families of the victims.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Sean Healy and Victoria Russell

people smugglers controlling the migrant trade. ( Hopkins, 2017 ) For evidence of this claim, Hopkins repeated the details of both the incident mentioned by the December 2016 confidential Frontex report, and copy-pasted directly, maps and graphs included, from the report by Gefira (2016a) about the October 2016 rescue. She then turned to themes of criminality, terrorism and the threat of swamping: Italy will

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

Capitalism ( London and New York : Verso . Original edition , 1999 ). BOND ( 2003 ), Joint statement by members of the International Global Security and Development Network on the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), ‘A Development Co-operations Lens on Terrorism Prevention: Key Entry Points for Action’ ( London : British Overseas NGOs for Development (BOND) ). Braidotti , R. ( 2013 ), The Posthuman ( Cambridge : Polity Press ). Brenner , R. ( 2006

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Military Tactic or Collateral Damage?
Abdulkarim Ekzayez and Ammar Sabouni

, they have been under constant and targeted attack as part of the weaponisation strategy of the GoS ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ). During the peaceful uprising, anyone found to be assisting wounded demonstrators or activists was prosecuted, tortured and sometimes killed. In 2012 the GoS effectively criminalised medical neutrality through anti-terrorism legislation that allowed prosecution of those treating demonstrators injured by government forces ( Fouad et al. , 2017 ). Doctors working in government hospitals were forced to misfile the cause of death of bodies of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Dispelling Misconceptions about Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Conflict and Displacement
Heleen Touquet, Sarah Chynoweth, Sarah Martin, Chen Reis, Henri Myrttinen, Philipp Schulz, Lewis Turner, and David Duriesmith

’, in Satterthwaite , M. L. and Huckerby , J. C. (eds), Gender, National Security and Counter-Terrorism – Human Rights Perspectives ( London : Routledge ), pp. 15 – 35 . Kropiwnicki-Gruber , Z. et al. ( 2018 ), Caring for Boys Affected by Sexual

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The Politics of Information and Analysis in Food Security Crises
Daniel Maxwell and Peter Hailey

some are more political – including direct interference, minders, intimidation of field teams, limiting or prohibiting access, creating real and imagined security obstacles and bureaucratic hindrances. These come from several sources: governments who do not want the depth of a crisis to be exposed, donors who do not wish to investigate deeply the impact of counter-terrorism restrictions or who expect to see ‘results’ from the money

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Bert Ingelaere

, A. , Rutayisire , T. , Sewimfura , T. and Ngendahayo , E. ( 2010 ), ‘Psychotrauma, Healing and Reconciliation in Rwanda: The Contribution of Community-based Sociotherapy’ , African Journal of Traumatic Stress , 1 : 2 , 55 – 63 . Ross , F. C. ( 2003 ), Bearing Witness: Women and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa ( London : Pluto Press ). Rukebesha , A. ( 1985 ), Esotérisme et communication sociale ( Kigali : Editions Printer Set ). Staub , E. ( 2011 ), Overcoming Evil: Genocide, Violent Conflict and Terrorism

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Leslie C. Green

of national liberation, and Protocol II 16 additional to the 1949 Geneva Conventions. Moreover, Article 3 common to those Conventions 17 already sought to impose minimal humanitarian considerations even in such conflicts. However, acts of violence committed by private individuals or groups which are regarded as acts of terrorism, 18 brigandage, or riots which

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Olivier Corten

of mass destruction were found. Defence: Not yet … Secretary General: Also, preventive war is not a legitimate reason for armed violence. When conflict arises between nations, peace must always be the ultimate goal […]. Prosecutor: Did the world ask you to be its saviour? Defence: In 1917, in 1941 and throughout the forty years of the cold war, the world asked us for help. And we gave it. But now the war on terrorism has begun and we can’t wait to be asked. We must do what has to be done. Prosecutor: So, you feel free to attack every nation of which

in Cinematic perspectives on international law