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The news media and war from Vietnam to Iraq
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

literature has emerged examining news media and the ‘war on terror’ or terrorism in general. We prefer to keep this work distinct from the war and news media literature discussed here. Terrorism is a form of activity that is very different from traditional war. Moreover, conflating terrorism with the topic of war risks reinforcing widely contested and problematic arguments that combating terrorism should be considered a form of war. The literature review provided in the following pages is concentrated on the surprisingly small number of studies that are based on detailed

in Pockets of resistance
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

more generally to funding terrorism. Negotiated (independent model) Oppositional (oppositional model) ‘war on terror’: link between war in Iraq and ‘war on terror’ rejected as invalid/ war will increase world terrorism. other – on a three-point scale: supportive, negotiated and oppositional. In presenting our findings in Chapters 5, 6 and 7, however, we have generally reported our framing measures from the perspective of the coalition.11 Framing of battle Predictably, promoting a positive image of coalition military progress was a central goal of the coalition. In

in Pockets of resistance
Evidence for supportive coverage and the elite-driven model
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

focus on fighting terrorism following the attacks of 9/11, the Blair government sustained its humanitarian discourse. Although Iraqi possession of WMD remained the central justification for the 2003 invasion, the humanitarian case for regime change was a regular feature of the British government’s rhetoric in promoting action against Iraq. Indeed, according to Bluth, ‘the “moral” case appeared in practically every speech, starting in April 2002, and was exemplified in the “Human Rights Dossier”’ (Bluth, 2005: 600) published by the UK government (Prime Minister

in Pockets of resistance