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Freedom of belief, freedom from belief
John Pritchard, Andrew Brown, and Emma Cohen

the plea that short-term deviations are necessary to combat international terrorism. In reality these interim measures have undermined settled principles of human rights. In addition, totalitarian governments have resorted to large-scale human rights violations on the pretext of fighting against terrorism. I am here to say that intolerance cannot be wiped out through intolerant means, though I recognise that governments face a challenge in dealing with a complex situation. In my work as United Nations Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief, I continue to

in Religion and rights
Attitudes towards subversive movements and violent organisations
Ami Pedahzur

THE DEMOCRATIC POLITY’S struggle against manifestations of extra-parliamentary extremism and political violence is accompanied by a similar and perhaps even more acute quandary than its contest with political parties. In this struggle the government possesses the means to substantially restrict the freedom of expression and association of its citizens, consequently harming a number of their democratic rights. However, in its struggle against extremism, violence and, at times, even terrorism, the democracy is sometimes impelled to employ

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
The state as actor
Ali Riaz

consent; it is an issue of Muslim victimhood and is viewed as consistent with the record of the West. It is now well documented that since the beginning of the war the resolve of the Muslim community to integrate with the mainstream has been weakened, thus contributing to further isolation.70 The connections between the Iraq War and growing radicalism and terrorism within Britain have been acknowledged by the Foreign Office and MI5, in two different internal documents in 2004. The Foreign Office permanent under-secretary Michael Jay, in a letter to the cabinet secretary

in Islam and identity politics among British-Bangladeshis
From the ‘militant’ to an ‘immunised’ route?
Ami Pedahzur

, in the direction of the ‘immunised’ pole by the very fact that, for the first time, the objective and powers of the Shabak, as well as the means of accounting for its actions, will now be more clearly defined. 2 Another step in the same direction can be detected in the Ministry of Justice’s repeated efforts to address state policy regarding the ‘incitement to violence’ offence and confine it to a legal framework, thus replacing the Ordinance for the Prevention of Terrorism and other widely used administrative measures. In the summer of 2001

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Abstract only
Ali Riaz

mainstream society and their ethnic communities, and were either born and brought up in Britain or grew up there. Rohan Gunaratna argues, ‘Every major terrorist act in the West in the past decade, with the exception of Oklahoma City, utilized immigrants or immigrant communities.’31 In similar vein, Claude Moniquet, the Director General of the European Strategic Intelligence and Security Centre, stated in 2005, ‘Recruits [of the new generation of terrorism] come from the “Third Generation” of immigration, who we know has identity problems and feels itself the victim of

in Islam and identity politics among British-Bangladeshis
Open Access (free)
The ‘defending democracy’ in Israel – a framework of analysis
Ami Pedahzur

Giovanni Capoccia, ‘Defending Democracy: Reactions to Political Extremism in Inter-War Europe’, European Journal of Political Research, 39:4 (2001). 6 For example: Peter Chalk, ‘The Liberal Democratic Response to Terrorism’, Terrorism and Political Violence, 7:4 (1995), pp. 10–44; Raphael Cohen-Almagor, ‘Combating Right-Wing Political Extremism in Israel: Critical Appraisal’, Terrorism and Political Violence, 9:4 (1997), pp. 82–105; Ronald D. Crelinsten and Alex P. Schmid, ‘Western Responses to Terrorism: A Twenty-Five Year Balance Sheet

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Chris Miller

reacts to terrorism with a blithe disregard for its own human-rights commitments. ‘When the Islamic party in Algeria wanted to practice democracy and won the election, you unleashed your collaborators in the Algerian army on them … a new lesson from the “American book of democracy” … your Ministry of Foreign Affairs issues annual reports containing statistics of those countries that violate Human Rights. However, all those values vanished when the mujahidin hit you [on 9/11] and you then implemented the methods of the same documented governments that you used to curse

in Religion and rights
Abstract only
Ronald Dworkin

debate whether economic rights are properly counted among human rights. Just now the focus is on a large and fundamental issue that is both intensely practical and deeply, abstractly, theoretical. Where do human rights come from? The theoretical character of that very large question is obvious. Its practical importance rises from the deeply cross-cultural character of contemporary violence. We in the Western democracies appeal to human rights to justify our military policies: to justify the war we make on states we accuse of fomenting terrorism, for instance, or of

in Religion and rights
Ami Pedahzur

’, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 21:6 (1998), pp. 1096–115. 6 Sheri Berman, ‘Civil Society and the Collapse of the Weimar Republic’, World Politics, 49:3 (1997), pp. 401–29. 7 William, L. Eubank and Leonard Weinberg, ‘Terrorism and Democracy within One Country: The Case of Italy’, Terrorism and Political Violence, 9:1 (1997), pp. 98–108. 8 Michael W. Foley and Bob Edwards, ‘Escape from Politics: Social Theory and the Social Capital debate’, American Behavioral Scientist, 42 (1998), pp. 550

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Norman Bonney

believe they have access to that they are prepared to engage in terrorism and warfare to spread the message, impose their doctrines and rituals on others and sometimes claim a monopoly of state religious doctrine and practice on their behalf. If each religion and denomination attaches such significance to its own history, existence, doctrine and ritual and its special ‘spiritual’ insights and ‘tradition’, how can it find genuine common ground with other religions and denominations that have different interpretations and practices without abandoning its core beliefs and

in Monarchy, religion and the state