Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 182 items for :

  • "Terrorism" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All

This edited collection surveys how non-Western states have responded to the threats of domestic and international terrorism in ways consistent with and reflective of their broad historical, political, cultural and religious traditions. It presents a series of eighteen case studies of counterterrorism theory and practice in the non-Western world, including countries such as China, Japan, India, Pakistan, Egypt and Brazil. These case studies, written by country experts and drawing on original-language sources, demonstrate the diversity of counterterrorism theory and practice and illustrate that how the world ‘sees’ and responds to terrorism is different from the way that the United States, the United Kingdom and many European governments do. This volume – the first ever comprehensive account of counterterrorism in the non-Western world – will be of interest to students, scholars and policymakers responsible for developing counterterrorism policy.

Challenges, conundrum and resolution
Muhammad Feyyaz

Introduction Pakistan has achieved a number of important successes in its bid to curb domestic terrorism. 1 Some analysts have described the country's counterterrorism struggle as a success attributed to the predominant role of the military. 2 Indeed, the degree of security produced by the military-led counterterrorism (CT) campaign is noteworthy; it is equally true that this effort has concomitantly been subverted by other important actors in the social and political arena. 3 The prevailing environment can be conceptually termed as an

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Chiyuki Aoi and Yee-Kuang Heng

concerns topped the priorities of security in Japan, with terrorism coming in way down the list of concerns. However, in January 2015, news of a hostage crisis involving Japanese nationals held captive by the Islamic State (IS) in Syria was greeted by shock and bewildered surprise. Rolling media blanket coverage ensured that terrorism instantly rocketed up the security and public agenda. A typical news report suggested the brutal nature of the beheadings and videos provided a ‘shock to a country that can feel insulated from distant geopolitical problems’ and that Japan

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
A matter of discourse
Oscar Palma

Introduction Discourses on terrorism are not foreign to Colombian society. The word is used every day by politicians, state officials, academics, journalists, analysts and people in the streets. Every Colombian has grown up understanding that terrorism is part of everyday life. The people have been victims of a wide range of actors, including drug kingpins, paramilitary squads, guerrillas and even state forces. Car bombings, armed assaults in towns, assassinations, kidnappings and massacres are common themes in the daily news. However

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Politico-legal manoeuvres and political Islam
Bashir Saade

لائحة الإرهاﺏتبعكم، بلّوهاواشربوا مَيتّها (This ‘terrorism list’ of yours, soak it and drink its water; Hassan Nasrallah, widely broadcast speech, 25 May, 2013) Introduction Lebanon, like many other places in the world, has known deadly attacks against civilian areas that carried specific political messages. But unlike most other places, especially in the West, Lebanon's political tradition has been mired with car-bomb attacks, targeted assassinations and deadly plots of various kinds. Sporadic security incidents have rocked the capital and several key

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Ali M. Ansari

Introduction For a state that regards itself as the intellectual heir to the French Revolution it is unsurprising that the ideas of ‘terror’ and ‘terrorism’ remain central to the controversies surrounding the nature of the Islamic Republic of Iran. 1 From an American perspective, the seizure of the US embassy on 4 November 1979 transformed Iran from an intimate ally into the leading ‘state sponsor’ of terrorism; an appellation that even the thaw in relations under the Obama administration has done little to change. 2 The revolutionary state

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Ekaterina Stepanova

Introduction The definition of terrorism used in this chapter interprets it as premeditated use or threat to use violence against civilian and other non-combatant targets intended to create broader intimidation and destabilization effects in order to achieve political goals by exercising pressure on the state and society . 1 This definition of terrorism excludes both the use of force by insurgent–militant actors against military targets and the repressive use of violence by the state itself against its own or foreign civilians. This author

in Non-Western responses to terrorism
Christian Kaunert

with Dr Sarah Leonard The external dimension of EU counter-terrorism and international actorness This chapter analyses the external dimension of EU counter-terrorism, a crucial aspect in the fight against international terrorism, which has been much and hotly debated (Reinares, 2000; Dubois, 2002; den Boer and Monar, 2002 ; Mitsilegas and Gilmore, 2007; Occhipinti, 2003

in European internal security
Mariela Breen-Smyth

Contemporary insecurities Mamdani (2002) argues that the ability to see ‘terrorism’ as a ‘new’ problem that began in September 2001 is dependent on an ahistoricism that denies more recent histories. Organisations such as al Qaida are not purely products of ‘radical Islam’ but co-productions of interrelationships with the West. Al Qaida was born of local political conditions and rivalries between Muslims and co-opted and deployed by the US in the past to serve its anti-Soviet political projects. During the Cold War, the ‘other’ was largely separated from

in Encountering extremism
Hussein Solomon

in South Africa, 6 as new recruits were trained in the deadly arts accompanying the rise of militant Islam across the African continent. For all these reasons, an effective counterterrorism policy is essential. If one examines the country's legislative framework, on the face of it South Africa does have a clear and comprehensive counterterrorism strategy. The US State Department's June 2015 Country Reports on Terrorism argues that the South African Police Service (SAPS) Crime Intelligence Division, the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation, the

in Non-Western responses to terrorism