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Philip Hammond

justification presented intervention as part of the ‘war on terrorism’, in that it was claimed that Saddam Hussein’s regime had connections with al-Qaeda (a claim which was also subsequently found to be untrue). As suggested by the name given to the US mission – Operation Iraqi Freedom – a third line of justification was that the war would liberate the Iraqi people and install a democratic government, thereby

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Writing on the body
Dana Mills

) through choreographic responses to anti-​state terrorism (Ulrike Meinhof by Johann Kresnik), dance during the Second World War, and dance and rights (focusing on works such as Victoria Marks’s Not About Iraq (2007)). All these analyses tackle choreographic works that have sought to elaborate and problematise issues discussed in words; very often, this is stated in the title of the piece. Kolb also states that the analyses in the book focus on twentieth-​and early twenty-​first-​century Western stage dance (though she does leave some space for developments beyond it

in Dance and politics
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

, simply to say that the war was a response to 9/11 leaves open, for example, the question of whether it was a matter of attempting to bring the organisers of terrorism to justice, as official statements tended to suggest, or whether it was more a case of exacting revenge or carrying out punishment – alternatives which could imply different judgements about the legitimacy of the military intervention. 1 Two main considerations

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Philip Hammond

A key finding of this study is that the sorts of explanatory frames which developed in the 1990s have been adapted for the ‘war on terrorism, with the most significant underlying continuity again being the presumption of sovereign inequality. At first glance it seems very odd to try to turn a response to a terrorist attack into a quasi-humanitarian mission involving aid drops and measures to end

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Post-Cold War conflicts and the media
Philip Hammond

‘the unchanging nature of the 500-year Western imperial crusade’ (1999: 38, 21). Pilger has also described the post-9/11 period as the ‘Colder War’, arguing that ‘The parallels are striking’ between the Cold War and the war on terrorism (Daily Mirror, 29 January 2002). Similarly, Noam Chomsky ( 1990 ) has argued that, for the US, the Cold War was ‘largely a war against the third world, and a

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

terrorism’; and the US provided training to the RPF military, supposedly simply to ‘professionalise’ it, but which in fact included instruction in psychological warfare and special forces operations (Washington Post, 16 August 1997, 14 July 1998). The largest camp, Mugunga, which had already absorbed thousands of refugees fleeing attacks on other sites, was shelled for six hours on 15 November 1996

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

-torn divided and desperate society divided … into a patchwork of clan fiefdoms a nation now riven by interclan hatreds a country in the thrall of rival warlords a society where terrorism and despair are intertwined among the same people this snakepit culture of nationalistic xenophobia, clan solidarity and blood

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts