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Abstract only
Katy Hayward

the Treaty of Nice in 2001. The difference this time, and a crucial one, was that the turnout was 53.1 per cent – higher than for either referendum on the Treaty of Nice. This disproved the theory (maintained by the pro-European political parties) that most Irish voters are ‘Yes’ voters by default and that they simply had to be encouraged out to vote; these parties actually had to compete (against a more effectual if typically disparate ‘No’ campaign) in persuading people how to vote. Yet criticisms made in the concluding chapter of this book regarding the conduct

in Irish nationalism and European integration
Brid Quinn
and
Bernadette Connaughton

cohesion policies, of which Ireland has been a major beneficiary. The debate has now broadened with more attention 5306ST New Patterns-C/lb.qxd 44 3/9/09 16:45 Page 44 Europeanisation and new patterns of governance in Ireland Table 3.1 European referendums in Ireland Date 1972 1987 1992 1998 2001 2002 2008 Topic Membership Single European Act Maastricht Treaty Treaty of Amsterdam Treaty of Nice Treaty of Nice Treaty of Lisbon Yes (%) No (%) 83.1 69.6 69.1 61.7 46.1 62.9 46.6 16.9 30.1 30.1 38.3 53.9 37.1 53.4 Turn-out (%) 70.9 44.1 57.3 56.2 34.8 49.5 53

in Europeanisation and new patterns of governance in Ireland
Gary Murphy

higher and lower levels to 42 and 20 per cent respectively was put forward by the government as both a cause and an effect of the economic boom. Warnings from Europe about government spending and the state of the public finances found no real outlet amongst the opposition parties and were summarily dismissed by the government and by McCreevy in particular. This is best summed up by the government’s attitude towards the first Treaty of Nice referendum campaign. The Treaty of Nice was agreed by the member states of the European Union in December 2000, and the government

in Electoral competition in Ireland since 1987
Abstract only
Institutional learning and adaptation to Europe
Nicholas Rees
,
Bríd Quinn
, and
Bernadette Connaughton

:45 Page 201 Conclusions 1111 21 3 4 51 6 7 8 9 10 1 1112 3 411 5 6 7 8 9 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40 1 211 201 European affairs. It is interesting to note that it took a significant shock to the political system – namely the failure to ratify the Treaty of Nice during the first referendum in 2001 – to change government–parliamentary relations (see chapter 4). Irish political elites had taken developments in the EU and Irish public support too much for granted, failing to recognise that events in Europe were distant from everyday concerns of Irish

in Europeanisation and new patterns of governance in Ireland
Nicholas Rees

fight against terrorism Copenhagen European Council, December 2002 ‘Berlin Plus’: EU access to NATO assets for RRF crisis management exercises Treaty of Nice, 2001 (2003) Formal institutionalisation of existing structures 5306ST New Patterns-C/lb.qxd 3/9/09 16:45 Page 175 Ireland’s foreign relations 1111 21 3 4 51 6 7 8 9 10 1 1112 3 411 5 6 7 8 9 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 40 1 211 Convention on Europe, 2003 175 EU Foreign Minister Draft Constitutional Treaty, July 2003 Solidarity clause Issue of Mutual Defence External Action Service

in Europeanisation and new patterns of governance in Ireland
Abstract only
Mary C. Murphy

early 1990s onwards has revealed volatile public support for the continued widening and deepening of the EU. The rejection of the Treaty of Nice in 2001 by the Irish electorate was followed by the French and Dutch rejections of the Constitutional Treaty in 2005 and, more recently, the Irish no vote on the Lisbon Treaty in 2008. The global economic crisis of the late 2000s has also tested the capacity of the EU to deal with unprecedented developments. The wider UK political environment has also changed in recent years. Following the 2010 general election, a hung

in Northern Ireland and the European Union
Euro-nationalism, not Euroscepticism
Michael Holmes

1998 – Treaty of Amsterdam Yes Yes Yes No 2001 – Treaty of Nice (1

in Ireland and the European Union
Abstract only
Nationalism in internationalism
Michael Holmes
and
Kathryn Simpson

rejection of the Nice and Lisbon treaties in Ireland. Because of the perception of Ireland as a good European, ‘when Ireland voted No to the Treaty of Nice in June 2001, the reaction in many quarters was as if a good pupil had suddenly misbehaved’ ( Holmes 2005a : 1). The further No vote on the Treaty of Lisbon in 2008 suggested that ‘Ireland’s long-standing consensus on the

in Ireland and the European Union
Abstract only
Katy Hayward

European Union in Irish official nationalism. However, after nearly thirty years of relatively uneventful EU membership, questions were raised regarding the success of this process given the rejection of the Treaty of Nice in the first referendum in June 2001. To what extent does this represent dissolution of the close ties between nation-state and European Union in Irish official nationalism? Until the June 2001 referendum on the Treaty of Nice, all referendums on EU treaties since accession had passed with a significant majority. Yet this majority had been in decline

in Irish nationalism and European integration
Katy Hayward

. This perhaps explains some of the divergence from the script around the first referendum on the Treaty of Nice in 2001, in which several Fianna Fáil government ministers were more frank than ever before in expressing concern about the direction of European integration (Hayward, 2002). Regardless of whether the ‘yes’ campaigning of government ministers is done whilst wearing an official hat, official discourse becomes no less important or revealing around referendums on EU treaties. The use of the ‘national interest’ card remains as frequent as ever in pro

in Irish nationalism and European integration