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Imperialism and culture in South Vietnam
Author: Duy Lap Nguyen

The unimagined community proposes a reexamination of the Vietnam War from a perspective that has been largely excluded from historical accounts of the conflict, that of the South Vietnamese. Challenging the conventional view that the war was a struggle between the Vietnamese people and US imperialism, the study presents a wide-ranging investigation of South Vietnamese culture, from political philosophy and psychological warfare to popular culture and film. Beginning with a genealogy of the concept of a Vietnamese “culture,” as the latter emerged during the colonial period, the book concludes with a reflection on the rise of popular culture during the American intervention. Reexamining the war from the South Vietnamese perspective, The unimagined community pursues the provocative thesis that the conflict, in this early stage, was not an anti-communist crusade, but a struggle between two competing versions of anticolonial communism.

Author: Sabine Lee

In the early twenty-first century, children fathered by foreign soldiers during and after conflicts are often associated directly with gender-based violence. This book investigates the situations of children born of war (CBOW) since the Second World War, provides a historical synthesis that moves beyond individual case studies, and explores circumstances across time and geopolitical location. The currently used definitions and categorisations of CBOW are presented together with an overview of some key groups of CBOW. Specific conflict areas are chosen as key case studies on the basis of which several core themes are explored. These conflicts include the Second World War (1939-1945) with the subsequent post-war occupations of Germany and Austria (1945-1955). The Vietnam War (1955-1975), the Bosnian War (1992-1995), some African Conflicts of the 1990s and early 2000s, in particular in Rwanda (1994) and Uganda (1988-2006), are also examined. In the case studies, the experiences of the children are explored against the background of the circumstances of their conception. For example, the situation of the so-called Bui Doi, children of American soldiers and Vietnamese mothers is examined. The experiences of Amerasian CBOW who were adopted into the United States as infants following the Operation Babylift and those who moved as young adults following the American Homecoming Act are juxtaposed. The book also looks into the phenomenon of children fathered by UN peacekeeping personnel as a starting point for a discussion of current developments of the international discourse on CBOW.

Tentative bridge-building to China during the Johnson years
Author: Michael Lumbers

This is a comprehensive study of US policy towards China during the presidency of Lyndon Baines Johnson, a critical phase of the Cold War immediately preceding the dramatic Sino-American rapprochement of the early 1970s. Based on a wide array of recently declassified government documents, it challenges the popular view that Johnson's approach to China was marked by stagnation and sterility, exploring the administration's relationship to both the Vietnam War and the Cultural Revolution. By documenting Johnson's contributions to the decision-making process, the book offers a new perspective on both his capacity as a foreign-policy leader and his role in the further development of the Cold War.

Ann Sherif

grass-roots groups that converged in Hiroshima during the 1960s articulated an emerging global norm: a fresh articulation of the notion of human rights.3 This chapter uses a case study to explore significant new articulations of the discourse of human rights during the Cold War that emerged as America’s legitimacy shifted v 165 v Ann Sherif during the Vietnam War and transnational dialogues among social movements became tremendously influential. Specifically, in 1966, five Hiroshima anti-nuclear activists and two Americans involved in the anti-Vietnam War and civil

in Understanding the imaginary war
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Duy Lap Nguyen

capitalism in the South Vietnamese context, from the v4v Introduction colonial era to the end of the Vietnam War. As a conceptual frame for the project, the first part of the book reconstructs the ideology that informed the seemingly improbable account of the conflict that Nhu relayed to Maneli during their meeting in 1963. From the point of view of Nhu’s Vietnamese Personalism, the war was not a contest between Marxism and nationalism, or communism and democracy (as it appears from a Cold War perspective), but an anti-capitalist struggle against Stalinism and US

in The unimagined community
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Michael Lumbers

feelers to the mainland.8 This work affirms that the Johnson presidency did not represent a period of stagnation, and that senior officials contemplated significant departures from long-standing China policy more than was recognized at the time. Parting from available accounts, however, it directly links evolutions in perception and policy to events which scholars have hitherto taken to be a cause of deadlock between Washington and Beijing: the Vietnam War and China’s Cultural Revolution. The specter of renewed Sino-American hostilities moved the Johnson team to extend

in Piercing the bamboo curtain
Sovereignty, surveillance and spectacle in the Vietnam War
Duy Lap Nguyen

The unimagined community v 7 v Image-making and US imperialism: Sovereignty, surveillance and spectacle in the Vietnam War The war in Vietnam is often described as a conflict defined by popular culture and modern mass media, as the first “television war” and the first “Rock ’n’ Roll war.” These phenomena, mass culture and media, which distinguished the war from earlier conflicts, were the products of what the national security advisor, Walt Whitman Rostow, referred to as a “society of high mass consumption.”1 The war, then, was a conflict waged by the world

in The unimagined community
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Doctors and medics in the Vietnam War
Carol Acton and Jane Potter

6 Crying silently : doctors and medics in the Vietnam War In his Second World War memoir, The Other Side of Time, American battalion surgeon Brendan Phibbs writes: ‘We were lucky in 1942. We didn’t have to shrink from pictures of screaming Vietnamese about to be raped and murdered by American soldiers at My Lai. There were no dead students scattered across the grass at Kent State. Where we stood in 1942 the air was charged, clean, dangerous, honest.’1 While our discussion of the Second World War, and Phibbs’s own book, shows that the air was not as ‘clean

in Working in a world of hurt
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Children born of war: lessons learnt?
Sabine Lee

Epilogue Children born of war: lessons learnt? CBOW are a global phenomenon. It is likely that the scale of this phenomenon will never be fully comprehended, as there are many reasons that account for the fact that data about children fathered by foreign soldiers and born to local mothers will remain inaccurate and incomplete. Despite this reservation with regard to exact figures, the analysis of the chosen case studies – the Second World War and its post-war occupations, the Vietnam War, the Bosnian Wars, sub-Saharan African conflicts and UN peacekeeping

in Children born of war in the twentieth century
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Women in the Vietnam War
Carol Acton and Jane Potter

5 Claiming trauma: women in the Vietnam War The Vietnam Women’s Memorial in Washington, DC is an isolated island of suffering (Figure  5.1). Placed at a distance from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial – the Wall– and the ‘Three Soldiers’ statue, it exists outside these more traditionally masculine commemorative narratives of war: the warrior and the dead (see Figures 5.2 and 5.3). Instead, it depicts the women’s war story, particularly that of the nurse. She is locked forever in the moment of holding the dying soldier – a pietà in which there is no redemption

in Working in a world of hurt