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Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles
Rony Brauman

’ personnel bearing that same emblem, based on the Swiss flag, in homage to the country hosting the conference. The Geneva Conventions have evolved, filling out with each successive conference, and their scope has been broadened to include the shipwrecked (1906), prisoners (1929) and civilian populations (1949). ‘Additional protocols’ were adopted in 1977, in the wake of the wars of decolonisation and the Vietnam War, to cover ‘irregular’ forces in domestic conflicts. The original

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

aspirations of the casualties of the attempt to create one world in the image of liberal freedom. Resistance was often futile or at least hugely costly (think of Vietnam). Wars were waged for decades to ensure no part of the system could harbour an economic model or an ideological commitment that was antithetical to the liberal capitalist consensus or refuse to open up its resources to the needs of the international market ( Robinson, 1996 ). Take, for example, Henri Dunant, the patron saint of modern humanitarianism, who was actually at Solferino

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

, these references also lead us into the global 1960s. It is only partly true that Biafra was the first postcolonial conflict that was discussed as a genocide – but the way these references worked changed with Biafra. Already before the American war in South East Asia, what is usually called the Vietnam War was then described as possibly genocidal. This was something that many New Leftists at least were concerned about. Some of their leading figures and intellectuals associated

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Abstract only
Leslie C. Green

contrary to the 1929 Convention’s provisions. As regards the Vietnam War, the National Liberation Front informed the ICRC that ‘it was not bound by the international treaties to which others besides itself subscribed. . . . [T]he NLF, however, affirmed that the prisoners it held were humanely treated and that, above all, enemy wounded were collected and cared for.’ 10 Since 1945 the majority of

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Olivier Corten

chapter contain no reference to issues of lawfulness of military interventions in Iraq (1991 and 2003, with the exception of W 47 and Vice 48 ), Yugoslavia (1999), Georgia (2008), Libya (2011), Ukraine (2014–) or Syria (2014–), to name but the particularly iconic examples. 49 To the extent of our knowledge, cinema does not enquire either about the responsibility, under international law, for triggering older conflicts like the Korean War, 50 the Vietnam War, 51 the US interventions in Cuba (1961), in the Dominican Republic (1965) or in Panama (1989), or the USSR

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Leslie C. Green

136–7. 72 Schindler and Toman, 1087. 73 This was a problem during the Vietnam War. 74 The Paklat [1915] 1 B. and C.P.C. 515

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
International humanitarian law in war movies
Martyna Fałkowska-Clarys and Vaios Koutroulis

excesses of the Vietnam war, such as Platoon 35 or Full Metal Jacket , 36 feature many attacks against civilians without any specific principle of humanitarian law being debated, or, a fortiori , interpreted. In such cases, the general critical overtone of the movie seems to convey a criticism of the violation of IHL in the way they depict combat actions. However, in other cases, the absence of any meaningful reference to IHL is rather the symptom of it being discarded as ill-adapted to modern warfare, unable to offer any meaningful guidance as to how hostilities

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Leslie C. Green

I, Arts 87, 82. 131 See, e.g., ‘Lesson Plan’ annexed to US Department of the Army, ASubjScd 27-1, 8 October 1970, ‘The Geneva Conventions of 1949 and Hague Convention IV of 1907’ and discussion thereon in Green, ‘Aftermath of Vietnam: war law and the soldier’, Falk, The Vietnam War and International

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Serge Sur

US film knows, more and better than others, how to criticize some excessive uses of force, either in their principle or in their methods. For instance, the Vietnam war gave rise, very quickly after defeat, to a rush of US films showing the vacuity and the cruelty of this conflict. 39 Compared to the relative scarcity of French cinema about the Algerian war – a film such as La battaglia di Algeri 40 had to be produced in Italy and was censored in France for a long time – there is, here, an undeniable superiority of US democracy, founded on the First Amendment

in Cinematic perspectives on international law
Leslie C. Green

is also forbidden to set a booby-trap designed to cause superfluous injury or unnecessary suffering, into which category there would fall the punji stick common in the Vietnam War. Booby-traps directed against the military 116 or military objects are not forbidden, which suggests that it is legitimate to booby-trap a residence in a village which has been evacuated of civilians. Replica rocks

in The contemporary law of armed conflict