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Unheard voices and invisible agency
Louise Amoore

6 Globalisation at work: unheard voices and invisible agency T he contemporary problematic of globalisation has encouraged a particular mode of knowledge to dominate explanations of social change. Academic and popular discussion of all matters ‘global’ have predominantly asked ‘what is happening’ type questions. It has become almost common sense to seek to explain the nature of the beast itself, making reference to technological and market structures as the driving forces of change. In this formulation the everyday lives of people are positioned passively

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Author: Louise Amoore

Bringing fresh insights to the contemporary globalization debate, this text reveals the social and political contests that give ‘global’ its meaning, by examining the contested nature of globalization as it is expressed in the restructuring of work. The book rejects conventional explanations of globalization as a process that automatically leads to transformations in working lives, or as a project that is strategically designed to bring about lean and flexible forms of production, and advances an understanding of the social practices that constitute global change. Through case studies that span from the labour flexibility debates in Britain and Germany to the strategies and tactics of corporations and workers, it examines how globalization is interpreted and experienced in everyday life and argues that contestation has become a central feature of the practices that enable or confound global restructuring.

Tim Robinson, culture and environment

Unfolding Irish landscapes offers a comprehensive and sustained study of the work of cartographer, landscape writer and visual artist Tim Robinson. The visual texts and multi-genre essays included in this book, from leading international scholars in Irish Studies, geography, ecology, environmental humanities, literature and visual culture, explore Robinson’s writing, map-making and art. Robinson’s work continues to garner significant attention not only in Ireland, but also in the United Kingdom, Europe and North America, particularly with the recent celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of his monumental Stones of Aran: pilgrimage. Robert Macfarlane has described Robinson’s work in Ireland as ‘one of the most sustained, intensive and imaginative studies of a landscape that has ever been carried out’. It is difficult to separate Robinson the figure from his work and the places he surveys in Ireland – they are intertextual and interconnected. This volume explores some of these characteristics for both general and expert readers alike. As individual studies, the essays in this collection demonstrate disciplinary expertise. As parts of a cohesive project, they form a collective overview of the imaginative sensibility and artistic dexterity of Robinson’s cultural and geographical achievements in Ireland. By navigating Robinson’s method of ambulation through his prose and visual creations, this book examines topics ranging from the politics of cartography and map-making as visual art forms to the cultural and environmental dimensions of writing about landscapes.

Tim Robinson’s place in Irish Studies
Eamonn Wall

calling as a writer, it is likely that Robinson prefers it this way. In those West of Ireland places (the Burren, Connemara and Árainn), or spaces to use the term he favours, Robinson is nowhere visible though everywhere present, as Flaubert might put it. At the same time, Roundstone is in the process of becoming a centre of learning, the harbour master’s home having been deeded to the National University Ireland-Galway by its current occupants. Robinson, who has always worked at a remove from the academy, is bringing the university to Roundstone. Instead of the scholar

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
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Ireland’s ‘ABC of earth wonders’
Derek Gladwin and Christine Cusick

west of Ireland Tim Robinson’s work continues to garner significant cultural and critical attention both in Ireland and abroad. Over the last forty years, his maps and writings have incisively documented the geography of what he refers to as the ‘ABC of earth wonders’  – the Aran Islands, the Burren, and Connemara.2 During this process of detailing specific places, Robinson has addressed the historical and geographical tensions that suffuse the Irish western landscape, one that the epigraph to this introduction aptly suggests brings an ‘endless transformation’ of

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Louise Amoore

6 Conclusion: an international political economy of work I n the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, we are living in an era of social transformation that has been defined by the concept of globalisation, just as it has been shaped by programmes of restructuring carried out in the name of globalisation. Yet, our era is also one in which people’s concrete experiences of transformation are diverse and contradictory. While for some, living in a GPE means holding and managing a portfolio of shares, business travel for a MNC, and increased prosperity

in Globalisation contested
The deep mapping projects of Tim Robinson’s art and writings, 1969–72
Nessa Cronin

3 ‘The fineness of things’: the deep mapping projects of Tim Robinson’s art and writings, 1969–72 Nessa Cronin But if it is true that Time began, it is clear that nothing else has begun since, that every apparent beginning is a stage in an elder process.The compass rose that unfurled about me in Aran, I now discover, had its stem in London.1 – Tim Robinson Tim Robinson’s work has become a touchstone for those interested in, and concerned with, the changing nature of the modern Irish landscape. In particular, the production of the maps of The Burren (1977; 1999

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Abstract only
Postcolonialism and ecology in the work of Tim Robinson
Eóin Flannery

14 Essayist of place: postcolonialism and ecology in the work of   Tim Robinson Eóin Flannery In his 1993 study of cartography and folklore, Mapping the Invisible Landscape, Kent C.  Ryden underscores the necessary interdisciplinarity of what he terms ‘the essayist of place’.1 Impelled by a desire to do justice to the complexity, or ‘thickness’, of place histories, of place – visual and textual – for Ryden, ‘the essayist of place is at once a cartographer, a landscape painter, a photographer, an archivist, and a folklorist, as well as a storyteller … [and] a

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
The poetic in the work of Tim Robinson
Moya Cannon

7 Thirteen ways of looking at a landscape: the poetic in the work of Tim Robinson Moya Cannon I owe Tim Robinson an enormous debt. Through his maps and writing he has introduced me, as he has so many others, to intimate corners of the landscapes and sea edges of the Aran Islands, the Burren and Connemara. Anyone opening one of Tim’s books or maps cannot but be immediately arrested by the quality of attention manifest there – by the combination of precision and resonance, the access to and obvious delight in a wide variety of academic disciplines and yet the

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
The restructuring of work in Britain
Louise Amoore

3 Producing hyperflexibility: the restructuring of work in Britain Change is opening up new horizons; but there is fear of what may lie within them. Technology and global financial markets are transforming our economies, our workplaces, our industrial structure. Economic change is uprooting communities and families from established patterns of life. The way we live, as well as the way we work, our culture, our shared morality, everything, is under pressure from the intensity and pace of change … It can be exhilarating. But it is certainly unsettling

in Globalisation contested