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Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

’s experiences cannot be captured within one (white) feminist theory as their her story involves unique, numerous and varied experiences. This idea of an ethnocentric, essentialist white feminism is summed up by Harris (1990: 585): ‘their work, though powerful and brilliant in many ways, relies on what I call gender essentialism – the notion that a unitary, “essential” women’s experience can be isolated and described independently of race, class, sexual orientation, and other realities of experience.’ [Quotation from a second-year sociology student’s essay

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

failing to share their evaluation results and insights, and this has led to criticism of the community and individual projects for ‘reinventing the wheel’. This chapter will highlight not only why it is important to share best practice with this community but also how readers might further disseminate their work. It also considers the ‘conundrum’ of communicating about research communication. The chapter finishes with a short summary of the key points of this book and what we hope are encouraging and motivational, confidence-building insights that will enable readers to

in Creative research communication
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

Internationally, public engagement and communication has become an important aspect of research and policymaking, allowing research establishments, and their researchers, to explore public perspectives on their work as well as providing access to research findings to wider publics. Alongside this, a considerable research communication and public engagement community has emerged, who are interested not only in the design, techniques and methods for research communication and engagement but also approaches to communicating creatively and evaluating the

in Creative research communication
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

In many institutions the dissertation is the equivalent of a whole course, and is sometimes optional. Its length is commonly around 10,000 words, perhaps a little more or a little less. There are also degree schemes in which a shorter dissertation, usually of around 6,000 words, is possible. Whatever the length, the dissertation is likely to be the most significant, extended piece of work that you will produce during your time as an undergraduate student. It can certainly represent a challenge to your analytical and creative powers. But it also offers

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

true for your tutors when they assess your work. For the most part, students use the conclusion to summarise the points they have made in the middle of the essay, and link their conclusions back to the essay question and to the opening paragraphs. While this is essential to producing a good conclusion, it is not enough. It is also reasonably common for students to include some of their own thinking or opinion on the question at hand. This is perfectly acceptable, but it is important that your opinions make some sense in relation to the evidence you have

in The craft of writing in sociology
Theory and practice

Considering how to communicate your research or engage others with the latest science, social science or humanities research? This book explores new and emerging approaches to engaging people with research, placing these in the wider context of research communication. Split into three sections, Creative Research Communication explores the historical routes and current drivers for public engagement, before moving on to explore practical approaches and finally discussing ethical issues and the ways in which research communication can contribute to research impact.

Starting from the premise that researchers can and ought to participate in the public sphere, this book provides practical guidance and advice on contributing to political discourse and policymaking, as well as engaging the public where they are (whether that is at the theatre, at a music festival or on social media). By considering the plurality of publics and their diverse needs and interests, it is quite possible to find a communications niche that neither offers up bite-sized chunks of research, nor conceptualises the public as lacking the capacity to consider the myriad of issues raised by research, but explains and considers thoughtfully the value of research endeavours and their potential benefits to society.

It’s time for researchers to move away from one-size fits all, and embrace opportunities for creative approaches to research communication. This book argues for a move away from metrics and tick box approaches and towards approaches that work for you, as an individual researcher, in the context of your own discipline and interests.

This book guides students in how to construct coherent and powerful essays and dissertations by demystifying the process of creating an argument and helping students to develop their critical skills. It covers everything from the beginning stages of reading critically and keeping notes, through to the final stages of redrafting and proof-reading. It provides step-by-step instructions in how to identify, define, connect and contrast sociological concepts and propositions in order to produce powerful and well-evidenced arguments. Students are shown how to apply these lessons in essay writing, and to a longer piece of writing, such as a dissertation, as well as how to solve common problems experienced in writing, including getting rid of waffle, overcoming writer’s block and cutting an essay down to its required length. For students wishing to improve their basic writing skills or to refresh their memories, the book also gives a clear and concise overview of the most important grammatical rules in English and how to use them to good effect in writing clear sentences and sensible paragraphs.

Examples from essays written by sociology students at leading universities are used throughout the book. These examples are used to show what students have done well, what could be done better and how to improve their work using techniques of argument construction. It will be of use to students studying sociology and related disciplines, such as politics, anthropology and human geography, as well as for students taking a course which draws upon sociological writing, such as nursing, social psychology or health studies.

Andrew Balmer and Anne Murcott

writing your essay with less of a plan in place and you are still working out your argument as you write, then it is very important indeed to remember, once you have written the first draft, to go back and rewrite your introduction to make sure that it exactly reflects the argument you have ended up making. Whichever way you work, there are some important considerations to think about when determining what to include in your introduction and how to organise it. So, whether you are writing your beginning with a clear understanding of what you intend to argue, or

in The craft of writing in sociology
Abstract only
Clare Wilkinson and Emma Weitkamp

Despite C.P. Snow’s framing of the arts and science as two cultures with little common ground, art, science and technology have long been bedfellows (Snow, 1993 ). Advances in science and technology have stimulated developments in the arts as well as acting as inspiration for cultural activities, and visual techniques from the arts have been used to inform and facilitate research across a broad range of disciplines. From Brunelleschi’s early work on perspective, through to the modern day, examples of cross ‘cultural’ impact abound, with artists exploring

in Creative research communication
Helen Brooks, Penny Bee, and Anne Rogers

Lewis, 2003). Three main types of qualitative research methods were used within the EQUIP programme of work and these will form the focus of the current chapter: in-depth interviews, focus groups and observations. Throughout the chapter, the authors will refer to allied publications resulting from EQUIP as a way of providing examples of real life research to support the description of the methodological approaches provided. Learning objectives By the end of this chapter you should be able to: 1. Understand different types of qualitative research methods 2. Understand

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers