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P. J. P. Goldberg

Grene that the aforesaid Joan and her family unjustly mowed grass on the bound between them and took more than she ought to do. Accordingly it is judged that the aforesaid Joan is in mercy and Roger should receive damages from her. [c] [1300] Day in autumn. The daughter of William de Wylinghurst, two daughters of Nicholas le Yonge, two daughters of Thomas Colling, and the daughter of Dygan to work two

in Women in England c. 1275–1525
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P. J. P. Goldberg

tapestry wrought upon the loom after the manner of Arras work and made of false work by Katherine Duchewoman in her house at Finch Lane, being four yards in length and seven quarters in breadth, seeing that she had made it of linen thread beneath, but covered with wool above, in deceit of the people and against the ordinance of the aforesaid craft, and they asked that the ‘coster’ might be declared to be

in Women in England c. 1275–1525
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C. E. Beneš

fruits will persist in heaven, as the Lord says: Do not work for food that perishes but for that which endures in eternal life . 2 It is therefore fitting to take refuge occasionally in the tranquillity of the mind and to see with the mind's eye how sweet the Lord is . 3 Furthermore, from time to time it is useful to commit to writing certain

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Editor: C. E. Beneš

This book provides the first English translation of the Chronicle of the city of Genoa by the thirteenth-century Dominican Jacopo da Varagine (also known as Jacobus de Voragine). While Jacopo is better known for his monumental compilation of saints’ lives, the Golden legend, his lesser known Chronicle of Genoa exemplifies the important medieval genre of the civic chronicle. The work mixes scholarly research about the city’s origins with narrative accounts based on Genoese archival sources, more didactic and moral reflections on the proper conduct of public and private life, and personal accounts of Jacopo’s own experience as archbishop of Genoa from 1292 until his death in 1298. Divided into twelve parts, the work covers the history of Genoa from its ancient origins up to Jacopo’s own day. Jacopo’s first-hand accounts of events in which he himself participated—such as the great civic reconciliation of 1295, over which he himself presided—provide a valuable contrast to the more scholarly and didactic sections of the work. Together they form an integrated, coherent approach to urban history, which illustrates some of the most important styles of historiography in the Middle Ages.

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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

spiritual support and material sustenance to the ruler and the governing elite. 4 Wala’s religious reputation, therefore, was crucial to the overall judgement of his qualities as a leader of his people. Nor can the outspoken second book be understood as a narrative of political history in the modern sense of the word. Its loud lamentations about a dismal present turn the work into a retrospective prophecy, reminiscent of the prophet Jeremiah, who recorded the tribulations of his people with hindsight, as an exile. This was how Radbert portrayed Wala, and by association

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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C. E. Beneš

Paradoxically, Jacopo da Varagine may be one of the least-known authors of the Middle Ages. As Jacobus de Voragine —the commonest Latin form of his name 1 —the collection of saints’ lives he compiled in the 1260s, which came to be known as the Golden legend ( GL ), became one of the great medieval ‘bestsellers’. The work was translated into most of the European vernaculars, survives in

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

we now think of as public works, soliciting alms towards their projects and performing the labour with their own hands. Most characteristically, we find them building and maintaining roads and causeways [ 37 ], [ 39 ], or working on bridges [ 37 ], [ 42 ]. We might not find it too difficult to accept such work as charitable, but it is less usual today to think of it as pious . The Middle Ages, however, was used to thinking allegorically of life

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

of the tomb call out but, “Hurry to me, hurry. Come, come; hurry, hurry. For this was our agreement when you enclosed yourself in our little house”.’ 7 These ideas are picked up towards the end of the work in the ‘Memorial before the Tomb’, which is translated here. Translated from the Latin, chapter 30, edited by Livarius Oliger, ‘ Regula Reclusorum Angliae et Quaestiones tres de Vita solitaria saec

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

]. Monks alternated prayer with work (the ora et labora of Benedictine tradition), and the Desert Fathers wove baskets or plaited rope to ward off the spiritual lethargy they called acedia – put simply, boredom. In an ironic little poem Charles d’Orleans pretends to envy the anchorite, who ‘has no more him for to grieve / Than sole alone upon the walls stare’. 7 As St Benedict had pointed out, idleness is the enemy of the

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
C. E. Beneš

. Because they attributed to him the beginnings and endings of all things, they gave him two faces—one in front, with which he oversaw beginnings, and the other behind, with which he oversaw endings. For this reason, when the Romans wished to begin some work, they sacrificed to the face of Janus which was on the front part [of the statue] so that he would look favourably on their undertaking. And when they finished, they sacrificed to the face that

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa