Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 643 items for :

  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
The Central Sphagnum Depot for Ireland at the Royal College of Science for Ireland, 1915–19
Clara Cullen

effort. This chapter provides an example of how voluntary work was organised on the domestic front in Ireland from August 1914 to meet the increasing demands of war, focusing on one specific initiative – the work of the Voluntary Aid Detachments (VADs) 1 in the Royal College of Science for Ireland in organising the collection, treatment and delivery of Sphagnum moss as an alternative medical

in Medicine, health and Irish experiences of conflict 1914–45
Humanity and relief in war, Britain 1870–1914
Author: Rebecca Gill

The history of relief work is in its infancy. This book draws on new archival research to reveal the priorities of nineteenth-century relief workers, and the legacies of their preoccupations for relief work today. It first explores the inauguration of the British National Society for Aid to the Sick and Wounded in War (NAS) at the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War in 1870 under the figurehead of Loyd Lindsay. Then, the book sees the revival of the NAS for work in the Balkans during a period of nationalist violence and Ottoman counter-insurgency which culminated in the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-1878. It also follows the staff of relief committees as they dispensed aid in British colonial wars. The book examines the critiques of British policy in the Boer War (1899-1902) emanating from intersecting circles of Quakers, New Liberals and ethicists, and considers these groups' offer of aid to Boer civilians. Further, the book concentrates on the methodologies of relief for Boer inmates of British concentration camps in South Africa and on the implications of this relief for its intended recipients during and after the war. It concentrates on aid to British soldiers. The book closes by tracing continuities in vocational practices and dispositions to emerging areas of concern in the post-war period, in particular child welfare, and briefly considers their implication for relief work today.

Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

’s perspective. Stories are integral to human communication and our primary means of transmitting experience. The oral narratives that comprise this book’s sources are stories; that is, they are narrated versions of parts of autobiographical memory. They are interpretations of the past. In his essay on ‘The painter of modern life’, the nineteenth-century French poet Charles Baudelaire, whose work ushered in modern(ist) ideas about subjectivity, wrote that when a work of art is viewed, what reaches that spectator is not the painter’s replication of a scene from reality, but a

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

installations – factories, railway depots, and so on – were surrounded by the communities whose members worked in them. Home and family were at the centre of children’s worlds, and journeys across bombed towns to find them were nailed to adult memories of the aftermath. Children also encountered death – first-, second- and third-hand – in the wake of air raids; these were public, violent deaths, that contributed to juvenile understanding of war and bombing. War drew the public and private realms together, but wedged between state and citizen was community. Assistance in the

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

‘nests’ of Nazis, ferociously holding onto the port towns. Eighty per cent of all raids on France took place during 1944. Yet for some, bombing had been part of daily life since 1940. The study of everyday life in France during the Vichy years is a field still growing. For example, recent work by Shannon L.  Fogg, Nicole Dombrowski Risser and Julia S. Torrie is testament to a growing interest in the political dimensions of everyday life. Torrie’s work in particular shifts the discussion significantly towards civilian rather than daily life: it recognises that much of

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

clandestine publishing made it impossible for resistance movements to consider publishing for children, the BBC French Service in London broadcast to children in France from summer 1941. ‘Fifteen Minutes for French Children’ (Le Quart d’Heure des Petits Enfants de France) was largely written by the Gaullist journalist Yves Morvan (known as Jean Marin) and by Miriam Cendrars (daughter of the writer Blaise Cendrars), who also worked with Georges Boris v 184 v Explaining bombing to children at de Gaulle’s headquarters, Carlton Gardens. So while the Free French and the BBC

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

edge. They are adamant that German and Vichy propaganda did not work on the French population. Again, they demonstrate broad awareness of the time, such as the names of broadcasters and collaborationists, who are no longer household names, but are well enough known to those with an active interest in the Vichy era. Perhaps Michel and Claude were this aware in their youth; perhaps they have both read a great deal about it in their adult lives. The point here is their emphatic denunciation of the effectiveness of anti-Allied propaganda. They wanted their audience – me

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Ian McEwan’s The Children Act and the limits of the legal practices in Menke’s ‘Law and violence’
Ben Morgan

law, there are the disagreements, compromises, and/​or impositions from which a particular, normalizing, legal framework emerges. This might suggest that we can curb the violence of the law and escape the paradox by drawing attention to the discussions and struggles from which a normative framework arises. The law as impersonal imposition could be replaced with law as a set of negotiated standards agreed by a group of people amongst themselves, and open to renegotiation where the group sees fit. But, for Menke, this solution will not work because the people doing

in Law and violence
Lindsey Dodd

German orders.3 All of Boulogne-Billancourt’s schools were closed in September 1943.4 In Paris, Max Potter revelled in his freedom from April 1944: ‘I was on holiday for six months!’ Claude Thomas (Boulogne-Billancourt) attended six or seven different schools between 1939 and 1946. Of a sanguine disposition, he did not view these changes as damaging overall, saying ‘we worked normally. We adapted to it.’ It was different for others. Andréa Cousteaux (Brest) regretted the curtailment of her schooling: ‘I’d gone to secondary school. But not long after, they closed it

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
A conclusion
Lindsey Dodd

became angry when describing his horrible bombsite work. Women’s trauma – in this very small group – seemed more evident in the remembering and men’s in the telling. Evaluating impact beyond the individual Using oral history has enabled me to examine individual trajectories and to understand the lasting impact on private lives. But it can also permit a more generalised analysis beyond the individual. Because, as Alessandro Portelli deftly noted, oral histories connect the life with the times – that is, they link the individual to the historical context.1 I have argued

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45