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Incest and beyond
Jenny DiPlacidi

and gender made in this book has implications for the convention’s treatment in other works; how, for example, does sibling incest emerge in twentieth-century Gothic novels such as V. C. Andrews’s Flowers in the Attic (1979)? With what set of concerns are depictions of cousin incest, aestheticised violence and abuses of power engaged in Joyce Carol Oates’s First Love: A Gothic Tale

in Gothic incest
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Marie Mulvey-Roberts

, nationalist or religious hegemonies, seldom aware of how they too participate in the creation of monstrosity. Invariably the process of monsterising is born out of an abuse of power on a spectrum ranging from dictatorship to those who collude, albeit passively, with a repressive dominant ideology. As Michel Foucault indicates, Gothic narratives ‘are always about the abuse of power and exactions; they are

in Dangerous bodies
The spectacle of death and the aesthetics of crowd control
Emma Galbally and Conrad Brunström

political justice. If political executions are a form of theatre, then theatre itself lends itself to a readily politicised culture of spectacle. All Gothic theatre, and perhaps all theatre, concerns itself with the uses and abuses of power. The issue of how to accommodate yet sanitise spectacle can be explored by considering two lavish stage entertainments of the late 1790s: Aurelio

in The Gothic and death
Open Access (free)
Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

incestuous desires. The uncle, in stealing from the older brother, takes not just his property but his daughter, laying claim to Matilda’s body as his own. Weimar’s shifting desires towards Matilda show that his position as her father has culminated in the ultimate betrayal of power but also that such abuses of power and incestuous desires are the natural result of the available familial, legal and marital

in Gothic incest
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From White Zombie to World War Z
Fred Botting

gothic tropes and images distaste at the abuse of power associated with European modes of colonialism. For all its gothic trappings the film does not quite manage to cast everything into a past associated with Europe. It engages with the then modernity of film form, as, in Walter Benjamin’s critique, one of the most striking technical manifestations of crowded urban existence. Murder Legendre is not only a

in Globalgothic
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Suicide and the Gothic in modern Japanese literature and culture
Katarzyna Ancuta

herself and to hurt others. Although never identified as Gothic, all the texts examined in this chapter employ a variety of Gothic conventions – from monstrous landscapes and Gothic heroes, victims and villains torn by internal conflict, to depictions of cruelty and violence, often sexualised, grotesque monstrous bodies and minds, disease, political upheaval, abuse of power, conflicts of memory, trauma and haunting. While the portrayal of suicide in modern Japanese texts can be contextualised as Gothic, these texts also demonstrate that

in Suicide and the Gothic
Guilt, regret and suicide in three ghost stories by J. Sheridan Le Fanu
William Hughes

– provide a reminder of tangible and terrible deeds, force the remembrance of things suppressed, prompt if not confessions then at least acknowledgement of occluded crimes which the subject might well have hoped would have remained buried up to and after their own sepulture. If Harbottle and Barton unequivocally deserve moral condemnation on account of their fatal abuses of power, Jennings represents a more problematic reflex of the motif of spectral persecution as it is presented in the first three stories of In a Glass Darkly . The shy

in Suicide and the Gothic
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The Gothic in Northanger Abbey
Robert Miles

, the Vladimir Propp of the Gothic, for whom the father is just another motif. But for Catherine the genealogy of the Gothic reaches back past secret manuscripts to some initial, undisclosed, paternal abuse of power. In a curious reversal of roles, Henry, not Catherine, is the truly literal-minded; for him, Gothic discovery amounts to no more than the physical apprehension of manuscripts, whereas for

in Gothic writing 1750–1820
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

should desire to uphold it. However, all these feminist scholars expose patriarchy’s control of female sexuality through abuses of power that are encoded within the social structure. In a sense, the exchange of women that demands the incest taboo concurrently creates a system of control over female bodies that lends itself to incestuous sexual abuse. These scholars have revealed through the intersections

in Gothic incest
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

informed by the equation of father–daughter incest with abuses of power contribute to readings of these relationships as reflective of the abuses inherent in the emerging nuclear family and domestic spaces. 4 These understandings have focused scholarly readings of father–daughter incest in the Gothic on locating the perceived or real threats against the heroine within the home or castle. I argue that in

in Gothic incest