Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for :

  • "adaptation" x
  • Philosophy and Critical Theory x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Naturalism, will to power, normativity
Mark Olssen

only “giving” or “creating”’ ( 1983 : xii). Its potency as a concept is brought to bear most poignantly in On the Genealogy of Morals , where Nietzsche discusses evolution and natural selection. Will to power for Nietzsche offers a more powerful analysis of evolution and surpasses the concept of adaptation used by Darwin. Although Darwin provided for a detailed theory of natural selection to understand how life develops by natural processes, unaided by conscious design, what he never emphasized was the normativity of life itself in its quest to survive. In The Will

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics
Abstract only
Adorno, Theodor W. ‘Introduction to Prophets of Deceit’ (1949, previously unpublished)
Paul K. Jones

consciousness and adaptation of the individual to the prevailing mode of mass production. The psyche of men themselves is formed in a mould, as it were, and ultimately “expropriated” by those social agencies as whose mouthpiece the agitators style themselves. Here, as in many other aspects, fascism achieves suddenly, with one stroke – “ schlagartig ” was a favorite Nazi term – and seemingly from outside, what is brought about more inconspicuously and slowly through anonymous inner developmental tendencies of society itself. Such sociological trends provide

in Critical theory and demagogic populism
Objects, affects, mimesis
Simon Mussell

topic, tracing the relation between mimesis and processes of civilization and enlightenment. Their interest is in not only the archaic or pre-​civilized forms of mimetic behaviour, but also the persistence (or repression) of these earlier forms within contemporary capitalist society. The authors argue that in its archaic form, mimesis can be seen as a form of adaptation to the natural world in order to escape the threats posed by brute nature. This kind of mimetic behaviour is much like mimicry in plants and non-​human animals. Indeed, in the early phases of the

in Critical theory and feeling
Abstract only
Gunther Teubner’s foundational paradox
Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos

, generates an absence within (in this case, the contract as hybrid) which allows a most lyrical Teubner to emerge: ‘At the centre of the contractual phenomenon, there is thus a void, the central absence in the modern contract. Altogether, the contract ‘as such’ remains a mere configuration with no operative substrate of its own, an invisible dance of mutual adaptation, a secret coordination of consent, a grandiose relation

in Critical theory and legal autopoiesis
Catherine Baker

the region's popular music is perhaps the very musical movement with which this book began: Croatia's mid-1990s translation of ‘Eurodance’ music (a Dutch–German–Nordic format) into ‘Cro-dance’. Cro-dance combined sung vocals in Croatian, and English-language rap, with adaptations of the sound and style of Eurodance acts like Dr Alban and 2 Unlimited, who were very often black Europeans. Cro-dance producers explicitly named the Western, modern identity they ascribed their music as evidence that Croats had a completely different cultural mentality from the Yugoslav

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Catherine Baker

African presence was nevertheless erased in a Soviet racial politics that ‘productively link[ed] Russianness to whiteness’ (Fikes and Lemon 2002 : 517) abroad. Soviet racial formations influenced, but did not fully overwrite, constructions of race, whiteness and modernity in state socialist eastern Europe: adaptation to Soviet ideology was less an exercise in unthinking conformity, more an uneasy balance between responding to domestic factors and averting the coercion awaiting (as Hungary 1956 and Czechoslovakia 1968 reminded Communists elsewhere) a

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Abstract only
The hybridisation of contracting
Gunther Teubner

’ remains a mere configuration with no operative substrate of its own, an invisible dance of mutual adaptation, a secret coordination of consent, a grandiose relation consisting in the structural coupling of a multiplicity of meaning-processing systems. However one tries to frame it, the contract's unity (of meaning) disappears in the black hole of compatibilities, synchronisations, resonances, co

in Critical theory and legal autopoiesis
Abstract only
Melancholic dispositions and conscious unhappiness
Simon Mussell

individualistic retreats from, or localist adaptations to, the otherwise unaffected dictates of global capital, such actions are unlikely to provide the basis for any meaningful social and political resistance to capitalism (and let us be clear: there is no happiness under capitalism that is not underwritten by unspeakable violence and oppression elsewhere).79 Despite their best intentions, such movements will remain incapable of bringing about any substantive improvement in the overall sphere of human wellbeing so long as they remain exclusionary and parochial. Indeed, the

in Critical theory and feeling
Mark Olssen

that were necessary. This was the basis of his ‘problem-centred’ pedagogy of learning. While it could be seen to concentrate on transferable skills from a complexity perspective of coping with an environment, Dewey can be criticized for an overly functionalist concern with system adaptation, in the same way that structural-functionalist sociologists, such as Talcott Parsons, or contemporary systems theorists, such as Niklas Luhmann, can be. Focusing on a ‘problem-centred’ approach runs the risk, in other words, of neglecting the critical tasks of ideological

in Constructing Foucault’s ethics
Derrida, Luhmann, Wiethölter
Gunther Teubner

was thereby reduced to the necessity of having to take a legal decision, which requires venues, procedures and criteria. The concepts of the sociology of conflict were replaced by conflict-of-laws doctrine (connecting factors, characterisation, reference, renvoi , ordre public , adaptation, internal and external consistency). Wiethölter built up towering hierarchies of norms, convoluted interlacings

in Critical theory and legal autopoiesis