Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "adaptation" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Jessica Coatesworth

The first 100 years of printing in Europe was a vibrant period full of innovation and adaptation. Continental printers controlled the production of Latin books, many of which were imported into England. English printers worked hard to create an audience for their editions and achieved,this by adopting specific design features from the Latin editions. Yet despite this connection, English printing is often studied in separation from European printing. This article studies the Golden Legend, a hagiographic text popular throughout England and Europe, and shows that the two traditions were interrelated, especially in book design. On the continent, printers found themselves in a crowded marketplace and some adopted established designs to target a particular audience. In contrast, English printers were inspired by the design of continental books. Design was governed by the intended audience but not restricted to national demarcations. Not only was English printing integrated with European printing, it sustained a distinctive character while remaining part of the European tradition.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Carmen Mangion

space was un- (or sometimes re-) regulated. 12 Like every shift in religious life already discussed, the extent of change in spatial reordering varied by religious institute, and sometimes even between communities within the same religious congregation. The timing of changes differed too, but early shifts in the practice of cloister faintly visible in archival sources from the 1940s quickened with the publication of Council documents Perfectae Caritatis (Adaptation and Renewal of Religious Life, 1965) and Lumen Gentium (Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 1964

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Post-war modernity and religious vocations
Carmen Mangion

Sponsa Christi (1950) and the subsequent international congresses encouraging ‘adaptation’ and ‘modernisation’. In Britain, the response was the development of a more direct, public-facing and professional form of vocations promotion: vocations exhibitions. This chapter acknowledges the growing global, national and institutional awareness that fewer women were saying ‘yes’ to religious life in the 1940s and 1950s. Modernity is often marked by a shifting social, cultural, economic and political environment and a questioning of the past. 6 Women entering religious

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

Politics in France since 1789 (London: The Hambledon Press, 1991), pp. 149–66; Sarah A. Curtis, ‘Lay Habits: Religious Teachers and the Secularization Crisis of 1901– 1904’, French History, 9 (1995), 478–98; Caroline Ford, ‘Religion and the Politics of Cultural Change in Provincial France: The Resistance of 1902 in Lower Brittany’, journal of Modern History, 62 (1990), 1–33; Judith R Stone, Introduction 5 logical and manageable space of time in which to discuss simple-vowed women’s congregations. Methodology The publication of the Decree on the Adaptation and Renewal

in Contested identities
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

that urged an engagement with the modern world: adaptation, renewal and change. Female religious in Britain, weighed down by the reification of centuries of tradition, responded hesitantly. Then the 1960s: in the Church and in the world, ideas that had been slowly simmering began to bubble and sputter. The zeitgeist of the times was one of action. Expectations of a better world generated a radicalisation, religious and secular, explored and lived by laity, religious and priests. The Second Vatican Council (1962–1965) re-enforced that zeitgeist . New, more urgent

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

social movements. The post-war Modern Girl who entered religious life had life experiences that widened her horizons: she participated in diverse forms of war work, likely had increased financial independence and greater occasion for relationships with men and women within and outside her own social class. Pope Pius XII’s awareness of women’s changing role in a modernising world and a decline in vocations led to the apostolic constitution Sponsa Christi (1950) and subsequent international congresses encouraging the ‘adaptation’ and ‘modernisation’ of religious life

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

, that religious life was at a crossroads, with ‘people leaping over walls and the alleged seamy side of Convent life’, as well as talk of ‘new looks’, the shortage of vocations and the ‘crowded days of modern religious life’. She acknowledged religious were part of the modern world: ‘reform’ and ‘change’ were ‘in the air’ and ‘it is right and good that they should be’. Adaptations could and would occur in the ‘accidentals’ of religious life without affecting ‘essentials’ and she was convinced that the Modern Girl of 1959 would continue to adjust to these essentials

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

. Changes in the way religious life was lived were introduced in some religious institutes from the 1940s, but it was during the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965), that religious were encouraged to live in new, more radical and experimental ways. The worldwide, ecumenical council launched a ‘reform’ movement that was intended to modernise Catholicism while holding firm to ‘essentials’. For many women’s religious institutes, this necessitated a rethinking and oftentimes a reworking of the day to day praxis of religious life. The decree on the Adaptation and Renewal of

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

. 73 The Friars obtained permission (with much difficulty) from the Congregation of Religious for the formation of the International Commission of Poor Clares. 74 In 1968, twelve representatives from the Poor Clares gathered in Rome and formed a temporary community commissioned to tabulate the questionnaire results. 75 They were also charged specifically with informing the development of a common constitution in light of their understandings of aggiornamento and adaptation; their set aims were to ‘return to the sources of your monasteries’ and ‘clarify them [the

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Joseph Hardwick

purpose-built siloes are instances of colonial adaptation and an acceptance that drought was an inherent feature of the Australian climate. It is also noteworthy that the droughts that pushed back colonial settlement in South Australia’s northern districts prompted the development, from the 1880s, of ‘dry’ farming techniques appropriate to semi-arid regions. Other forms of explanation emerged: while some found the cause of droughts in sunspots, others recognised how human actions – notably deforestation and poor farming

in Prayer, providence and empire