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T.K. Ralebitso-Senior, T.J.U. Thompson, and H.E. Carney

In the mid-1990s, the crime scene toolkit was revolutionised by the introduction of DNA-based analyses such as the polymerase chain reaction, low copy number DNA analysis, short-tandem repeat typing, pulse-field gel electrophoresis and variable number tandem repeat. Since then, methodological advances in other disciplines, especially molecular microbial ecology, can now be adapted for cutting-edge applications in forensic contexts. Despite several studies and discussions, there is, however, currently very little evidence of these techniques adoption at the contemporary crime scene. Consequently, this article discusses some of the popular omics and their current and potential exploitations in the forensic ecogenomics of body decomposition in a crime scene. Thus, together with published supportive findings and discourse, knowledge gaps are identified. These then justify the need for more comprehensive, directed, concerted and global research towards state-of-the-art microecophysiology method application and/or adaptation for subsequent successful exploitations in this additional context of microbial forensics.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Migrants’ anchoring in an age of insecurity

This monograph argues that well-established concepts in migration studies such as ‘settlement’ and ‘integration’ do not sufficiently capture the features of adaptation and settling of contemporary migrants. Instead, it proposes the integrative and transdisciplinary concept of anchoring, linking the notions of identity, adaptation and settling while overcoming the limitations of the established concepts and underlining migrants’ efforts at recovering their feelings of security and stability. Drawing on 80 in-depth interviews with Polish migrants in the UK and Ukrainian migrants in Poland, ethnographic and autobiographical research together with an analysis of Internet blogs and forums, the book presents the author’s original concept of anchoring, underpinned by a combination of sociological and psychological perspectives, as well as demonstrating its applications. The book aims not only to provide a theoretical and methodological contribution to better understanding and examining the processes of adaptation and settling among today’s migrants, but also to highlight practical implications useful for the better support of individuals facing changes and challenges in new, complex and fluid societies.

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From theory to practical applications?
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

This monograph demonstrates the centrality of safety and stability in the narratives of Polish migrants in the UK and Ukrainian migrants in Poland. The presence of the references to security and stability, as well as the spontaneous usage of metaphors related to anchoring, support the relevance of the proposed concept and significance of safety and stability when seeking to understand migrants’ adaptation and settling. The concept of anchoring – understood as establishing and managing footholds which migrants use to recover

in Rethinking settlement and integration
A critical and integrative literature review
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

mobilities occur dialectically and this dyad is required in order to, on the one hand, problematise these notions and, on the other hand, combine both the ‘sedentarist’ perspective which treats place, stability and dwelling as a natural steady state, and the narratives of deterritorialisation, fluidity and liquidity (Bauman 2000 ). Hannam, Sheller and Urry's idea of moorings ( 2006 ) is also beneficial to understand differentiated opportunities and constraints in the processes of adaptation and settling visible in the processes of anchoring (including their material

in Rethinking settlement and integration
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Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

Migrant adaptation and settlement constitute a key research topic today, when spatial mobility is a global feature and migrants and their descendants represent a substantial share of European and other industrialised societies (Castles and Miller 2009 ; Massey et al. 1998 ). The United Nations (UN) figures – even if treated with the particular caution required in the case of migration data – estimate that in 2017 the global stock of international migrants officially residing outside their countries of birth was over 257.7 million, with 77

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Ukrainian migrants in Poland
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

This chapter attempts to theorise flexible adaptation and complex settlement processes among migrants from Ukraine in Poland through the lens of the concept of anchoring. I argue that traditional categories such as ‘integration’, ‘assimilation’ or ‘settlement’ are not sufficient to capture the ways of functioning and experience of the Ukrainian migrants studied in Poland. A similar conclusion was drawn by Drbohlav and Dzurova ( 2007 ), who noted that the Ukrainian migrants they researched could be characterised by their specific transnational

in Rethinking settlement and integration
From a metaphor through a sensitising concept to an empirically grounded concept
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

My previous long-term empirical research on the processes of adaptation and settling of Polish migrants in Belgium and later Vietnamese and Ukrainian migrants in Poland has provided a basis for my critical reflection on the limitations and sometimes insufficiency of the key concepts used in migration studies, especially the concept of integration (e.g. Grzymala-Kazlowska 2008a ). The political and practical usage of the latter – as well as its structural and functionalist assumptions that in order to maintain the existing socio-cultural order

in Rethinking settlement and integration
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Polish migrants in the UK
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

This chapter analyses the mechanisms of adaptation and settling among Polish migrants in the UK, where less circular migration was observed than in the case of Ukrainian migrants in Poland. Even though settlement processes remained more noticeable among the Poles than among the Ukrainians, they can still be better characterised in terms of anchoring rather than putting down roots. This may be linked, on the one hand, to a larger cultural and geographical distance between Poles and British society, and on the other hand to the situation at the

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Aleksandra Grzymala-Kazlowska

This chapter aims to synthesise crucial points about anchoring which emerge from my research with Ukrainian migrants in Poland and Polish migrants in the UK, to develop a framework that allows for a better understanding of the processes of migrant adaptation and settling. In order to outline key elements useful for building a general model of migrants’ anchoring, it concentrates on commonalities observed across both groups, in contrast to the previous chapters, which focused on Ukrainian migrants in Poland and Polish migrants in the UK as

in Rethinking settlement and integration
Toward rightful resistance
Wing-Chung Ho

having had the lung transplant. What he did admit was that he was unable to make any future plans due to his serious ill health; he said: “I don’t have any real plans [for the future]. I just live from day to day.” 7 Adaptation Sick workers who express the will and competence to cope with the competitive logic of the market economy while social marginalization caused by the disease was perceived as not imminent are called “adapters.” Among my informants, three (out of forty-eight) could be categorized as “adapters.” Undeniably, this 94 Responses to marginality

in Occupational health and social estrangement in China