Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for :

  • "adaptation" x
  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

more recent, post industrial adaptation, the historical roots of the modern city lie in the Middle Ages. The publication of this collection of written sources is intended to encourage and facilitate the study of that medieval phase in the evolution of our towns and cities. The reader who samples the texts in this volume will be struck by their diversity. In the period represented by these documents – from the eleventh

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

jurisdiction in Norwich The four ‘leets’ or areas of jurisdiction into which Norwich was divided for administrative purposes in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries had significantly older origins, probably antedating the Conquest. These principal districts of the city were subdivided so that householders reported to the courts by neighbourhood. The system was an adaptation of that used

in Towns in medieval England
Rachel Stone and Charles West

This chapter contains the translated text ofDe divortio. It has several underlying sections, responding to the questions that Hincmar initially received. These sections were, however, further divided to make the twenty-three responses which appear in the manuscript. The original sections are as follows: the procedure at the councils of Aachen, rules on marriage, divorce and remarriage, the validity of ordeals, the next steps in Theutberga's case, the sodomy charge, Lothar's relationship with Waldrada and sorcery, Lothar's possibilities of remarriage, and the response of bishops towards appeals to them and the case of Engeltrude. De divortio also deals with seven further questions which Hincmar received six months after the first: who is able to judge the king, can the king avoid further judgement in the case, the case of Engeltrude, and the effects of communion with the king.

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga
Abstract only
Diana Webb

: saints regularly turn water into wine or replenish exhausted stocks of wine or bread or other foodstuffs, as Christ did at the Wedding at Cana and when multiplying the loaves and fishes. The technique could easily spill over into a more thoroughgoing adaptation of a pre-existing model, which would not be regarded as good practice by modern biographers but was far from unknown in medieval and renaissance

in Saints and cities in medieval Italy
Andrew Rabin

. This homily, a loose adaptation of Æthelred’s ‘penitential edict’ of 1009 (VII Æthelred, translated below at pp. 186–8), survives in two manuscripts, Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 201 and Oxford, Bodleian Library, Hatton 113. 1 The text has long occupied a problematic place in Wulfstan’s homiletic canon, largely because it fell prey early on to a reviser of considerably

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Andrew Rabin

translation of Psalms 22:5: ‘and my cup, which intoxicates me, how brilliant it is’ (‘et calix meus inebrians quam præclarus est’). If so, Wulfstan’s adaptation of the verse would be in line with the interpretation propounded by Augustine: ‘We do not mean to say, “nobody must be inebriated”, but rather, “Go ahead and get inebriated, but from the right

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
Abstract only
Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Martin Heale

Knowles and others might be better understood as a ‘bold attempt at modernisation’ rather than evidence of decline – not least because many of these adaptations were the result of deliberate policy, rather than laxity or a lack of commitment. 17 The monasticism of this period was above all outward-looking, as the religious sought – with some success – to demonstrate that they still had something to offer

in Monasticism in late medieval England, c. 1300–1535
Abstract only
Andrew Rabin

second section contains those homilies and homiletic fragments most closely related to Wulfstan’s political writings. In some cases, the homilies draw upon the same sources as the political tracts, others are constructed piecemeal out of excerpts from the political tracts, and several are direct adaptations of individual political tracts for homiletic delivery. In Polity , Wulfstan writes that the

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York
The Norman Conquest
Elisabeth van Houts

the Norman adaptation of indigenous Anglo-Saxon institutions is comparable to the vikings’ adaptation of Frankish institutions in Normandy as well as the Norman acceptance of Lombard, and sometimes Byzantine, offices in southern Italy. Some innovations occurred, notably in knight service and military tenure, that is, the system according to which landholders receive lands to which obligations were attached, the

in The Normans in Europe
Abstract only
Andrew Rabin

behaviour of the secular clergy. In drawing upon these sources, Wulfstan is not, as some have suggested, revealing his ignorance of classical Church thought and doctrine; rather, he carefully selects those works most useful for the adaptation of Church doctrine for use by those clergy tasked with ministering to a lay flock. Canons thus fills a crucial role in Wulfstan

in The political writings of Archbishop Wulfstan of York