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Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

Since the end of the Cold War, NATO has been significantly reoriented and retooled across the board. This process of change has been captured under two main labels. Internal adaptation is NATO-speak for looking at how the institution works, and whether it can be made to work better and more effectively. The process has embraced the possibility of creating procedures and structures whereby European member

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Lindsey Dodd

Of the books produced for children not all were overtly ideological. Many were escapist or animal tales, little different from publications before and after the war.3 More ideological were stories of exemplary lives, cartoon adventures in comics and adaptations of fairy tales.4 A  more formalised propaganda appeared in Vichy’s schoolbooks.5 Yet neither Vichy nor the Germans could rid the country of pre-war books and comics. Children’s books about the Great War, depicting heroic Frenchmen, women, children and animals fighting the hated Boches were abundant, and

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Lindsey Dodd

conditions in the public world of war, with a consequent effect on children. Routines developed in response to the frequency of bombing and showed an acceptance of the intrusion of bombing into daily life. While habituation could create complacency, this was evidence of understanding, adaptation and resilience. Alerts and raids were even incorporated into games and social activities. Repeated raids could also diminish fears. After a while, Danielle Durville played in the street ‘in the rubble, that didn’t bother us. We got used to the noise, the bombs, the sirens’. In

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

omnipresent, but so are coping, ingenuity, persistence and adaptation: those living the experience are actors in its evolution.6 Robert Gildea rightly noted that French civilians were ‘more than traumatised souls lining up for bread or dodging bombs’.7 His mention of bombs here is important: in all these studies of civilian life, bombing serves as a backdrop, but has never been at the centre of scholarly analysis. Since 2007, Andrew Knapp’s meticulous documentation of the Allied bombing of France, its mechanisms, intentions and consequences in French society has led the new

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
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Mark Webber

the adaptation and enlargement of the EU and NATO. These bodies do not represent the totality of Europe’s security governance nor are they the sole expression of the broader phenomenon of a European security community. Yet they are, without doubt, among its most important defining features, to which there is now ‘no serious revisionist challenge’. 1 Such a view has guided the analysis of this book

in Inclusion, exclusion and the governance of European Security
Social policy in the third way
Jenny Andersson

the party over discrepancies between party ideology and social reality, put forward conceptions of a dramatically altered economic reality that required ideological adaptation. Similarly to how ‘1968’ in the Swedish context took the form of a radical left within social democracy, advocating ideological change after what they saw as a new social reality, this ‘neo-liberal’ critique of the 1980s was

in Between growth and security
Limitations and possibilities
Tarja Väyrynen

dissociative solutions, i.e. the possibility that the parties agree to disagree without conflict. 7 Face-to-face interaction in conflict resolution Problem-solving workshop conflict resolution forms a framework for mutual cultural adaptation. The participants, including the facilitator, need to find a ‘scheme of translation’ to produce ways to understand each other and to create a

in Culture and international conflict resolution
Theory and framework
Boyka Stefanova

of institutionalisation of European norms and governance structures (European integration per se ) and the penetration of EU-level rules and principles of governance in the domestic political systems. Europeanisation spans across several layers of politics: expansion of the territorial boundaries of European integration, creation of governance institutions, national adaptation and rule-following, export

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
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Europeanisation breakthrough
Boyka Stefanova

and success or failure. Indicators of repositioning of political actors, evidence of accommodation and adaptation to the evolving principles of EU governance, and changes in elite and public perceptions of the desired pattern of social interaction serve as more contextualised measures of the influences of European integration. Despite the fact that they reflect incremental change, such indicators

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
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Unmet expectations
Boyka Stefanova

(CFSP) formulates the EU’s political interests in safeguarding democratic values, peaceful relations, and human rights (European Union 2008a). The Eastern European enlargement made it possible for this value system to be translated into the domestic politics of the applicant countries by means of rule adoption and adaptation (Nugent 1997a , 1997b). Grabbe (2006), Lippert et al . (2001), and

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution