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Michael Chaney and Jason Lindquist

‘The Gothic Aesthetics of Eminem’ examines key videos, lyrics, and performances of the white hip-hop celebrity, noting the reoccurrence of such Gothic tropes and narrational strategies as self-replication, the spectacle of monstrous proliferation, the spread of fakery and the counterfeit, as well as the abjection of women. The authors compare Stoker‘s Dracula to Eminem, whose cultural menace similarly functions to proselytise white young men into clones, refracting the racial and sexual anxieties of Stoker‘s novel. The article moves from a consideration of the rapper‘s songs and videos ‘My Name Is’, ‘The Real Slim Shady,’ and ‘Stan’ to the film, 8 Mile.

Gothic Studies
Andrew Klevan

PART I What is evaluative aesthetics? What is evaluative aesthetics? 17 1.1  The origin and definition of aesthetics The concept of the ‘aesthetic’ is best considered as a cluster of interrelated meanings, and Part I will attempt to elaborate its multifaceted nature. Its Greek origin is aisthesis, meaning perception by sense, or feeling; more precisely it derives ‘from the Greek nominal aisthetikos, sensitive or sentient, derived in turn from the verb aisthanesthai, meaning to perceive, feel, or sense’ (Costelloe 2013: 1). Aesthetki is ‘the science of how

in Aesthetic evaluation and film
James Uden

Scholars of eighteenth-century literature have long seen the development of the Gothic as a break from neoclassical aesthetics, but this article posits a more complex engagement with classical imitation at the origins of the genre. In Horace Walpole’s formative Gothic novel The Castle of Otranto, his Gothic drama The Mysterious Mother, and in the curiosities in his villa, classical elements are detached from their contexts and placed in startling and strange juxtapositions. His tendency towards the fragmentation of ancient culture, frequently expressed through the imagery of dismemberment, suggests an aesthetic not of imitation, but of collection. Moreover, rather than abandoning or ignoring the classical, Walpole reconfigures literary history to demonstrate elements of monstrosity and hybridity already present in Greek and Roman texts.

Gothic Studies
¿Qué he hecho yo para merecer esto?
Ana María Sánchez-Arce

feísmo (ugly aesthetics) of the real apartment blocks in the Concepción. Almodóvar’s attention to the detail of social reality makes this one of his most difficult films to place. It is not realist, or overtly postmodern, or pop like his early films. Nevertheless, there is still humour and splashes of surrealism, including the presence of a pet lizard and the abrupt shifts to television programmes. The film’s black comedy also makes it difficult to classify. As Almodóvar comments: What Have I Done to Deserve This? is a film where again one finds several

in The cinema of Pedro Almodóvar
Clive Cazeaux

9 Aesthetics as ecology, or the question of the form of eco-art Clive Cazeaux Although the origins of ecological art or eco-art (I shall use the latter name from here on) are relatively easy to identify, the full meaning and scope of the name are not so easy to determine. The emergence of eco-art as a visual art form is arguably the result of a number of interrelated factors in the 1960s: American and United Kingdom countercultures, including disillusionment with government and material wealth; conceptual art’s reaction against traditional aesthetic values

in Extending ecocriticism
María Pilar Rodríguez

with no focus on cinematic productions. This chapter aims to address this imbalance by exploring the presence of punk aesthetics (or the lack thereof) in Salto al vacío and Historias del Kronen in the theoretical context of New Punk Cinema. Nicholas Rombes states that from the beginning of the 1990s a series of films emerged in different parts of the world, which became highly popular among mainstream audiences – films that

in Screening songs in Hispanic and Lusophone cinema
Martine Beugnet

spoken and written languages, to influence our strategies of representation, and to inflect the grammar and aesthetics of our cinemas: the way things and people are filmed keep on shaping and informing the vision that is proposed to the spectator. In the 1970s, feminist film theory demonstrated its effect on the representation of gender. The techniques at play in the representation of race in film also came under scrutiny, with their

in Claire Denis
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A General Model of Visual Aesthetics
Torben Grodal

This article argues that the central dimensions of film aesthetics may be explained by a general theory of viewer psychology, the PECMA flow model. The PECMA flow model explains how the film experience is shaped by the brain‘s architecture and the operation of different cognitive systems; the model describes how the experience is based on a mental flow from perception, through emotional activation and cognitive processing, to motor action. The article uses the flow model to account for a variety of aesthetic phenomena, including the reality-status of films, the difference between narrative and lyrical-associative film forms, and the notion of ‘excess’.

Film Studies
Mary Shelley‘s Frankenstein
Jessie Givner

This essay examines the Gothic trope of monstrosity in a range of literary and historical works, from writings on the French Revolution to Mary Shelleys Frankenstein to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I argue that, in the various versions of the Frankenstein myth, what has ultimately come to seem most monstrous is the uncanny coupling of literary and political discourse. Beginning with Jacobin and anti-Jacobin discourse, this essay traces the tendency of literary tropes to turn into political tropes. In Frankenstein and in the Victorian rewritings of Shelley‘s novel, the trope of monstrosity functions, with remarkable consistency, as a mechanism which enables the unstable and often revolutionary turns between aesthetic and ideological discourse. Because the trope of monstrosity at the heart of Frankenstein exists on the border between literary and political discourse that trope has emerged as one of the most crucial forces in current critical theoretical debates about the relationship between aesthetics and ideology.

Gothic Studies
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Cinema, Horror and the Abominations of Hell
Michael Grant

Beginning from a consideration of some ideas on aesthetics deriving from R. G. Collingwood, this essay sets Dreyer‘s Vampyr beside Fulcis The Beyond. The article then goes on to suggest something of the nature of the horror film, at least as exemplified by these two works, by placing them against the background of certain poetic procedures associated with the post-symbolist poetry of T. S. Eliot.

Film Studies