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Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin and Sönke Kunkel

, film, graphic materials, and museums. Harnessing diverse methodological approaches to the variety of those visual formats ( de Laat and Gorin, 2016 ; Kurasawa, 2015 ; Lenette, 2016 ), each of the contributions asks how the specific logics, demands, languages, and aesthetics of those media framed historical ways of presenting, seeing, and engaging with suffering. One important finding emerging from those inquiries is that each of those visual media – including the individuals behind them – shaped

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Architecture, Building and Humanitarian Innovation
Tom Scott-Smith

and cultural context. Architects are meant to focus on the unique appropriateness of a single design, carefully tailored to a situation. Architects are meant to consider the ‘softer’ side of shelter, looking at the quality of the space and the sensitivity of the aesthetics. Architects are trained to think about homes as deeply contextual, rooted in iterative processes of design. The result may indeed by utopian and unworkable, but it is very different from the work of innovators and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Visual Advocacy in the Early Decades of Humanitarian Cinema
Valérie Gorin

pictures to produce an immersive spectacle, relying on the cinematic realism of non-fiction movies to increase the ‘perceptual experience’ and the ‘aesthetics of astonishment’ of the viewers ( Crawford-Holland, 2018 ). Back in the 1920s, ‘cinema … “virtually” extended human perceptions to events and locations beyond their physical and temporal bounds’ ( Uricchio, 1997 : 119). Humanitarian cinema thus participated in transnational campaigns aiming to mobilize and sensitize national audiences. More specifically, these movies also advocated on behalf of distant

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

the World , for instance, promised ‘photographs of the family and its home’ that provided an ‘objective look into each family’s environment. There are no concessions to aesthetics or technique there. The photographs reveal the hard facts of life, and, in doing so, help us grasp the increasing depth of the chasm separating peoples and nations’ ( Tremblay, 1988 : preface). The authors of the psychopedagogical guide warned that the exposure of children to images of the Global South was to be done in a relation of trust. The pupils’ sense of honesty and fairness

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Cerwyn Moore

different emotional states interpenetrate each other across a number of levels and boundaries (individual/collective-psychological/sociological/biological).17 Difficult, particularly when considering the more recent work which draws on social constructivism, does not necessarily mean impossible. However, the reason for flagging up this difficulty in constructivist work is because other interpretive approaches, especially those associated with hermeneutics and aesthetics, are more attuned or better suited to interpret how emotions are captured and articulated through

in Contemporary violence
Towards interpretive pluralism
Cerwyn Moore

connected, the relationship between them requires a little introductory clarification. Indeed, as part of a preliminary consideration we must recognise that literature, as used throughout this book, does not stem from a coherent body of writing which has a distinctive form or a category which has a specific ‘indisputable literary essence’.61 Instead, the focus of the first chapter stems from the awareness of the literary as a way of conveying meanings. Literature and aesthetics as used throughout this book are employed to denote narrative forms or stories within a broader

in Contemporary violence
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

strategies: reduction to surface spectacle; mystification; assimilation to Western structures of aesthetics, narrative, or scientific explanation; reduction to a simplistic surface/depth model demanding unveiling; totalization; essentialization; and synecdochic consumption, accumulation, and representation.’21 Strain’s genealogy of tourism and travel reveals the collapse of the tourist gaze into the increasing professionalization of the adventure travel that later became legitimized as anthropology (and, by extension, evolved into fieldwork practices that leaked into other

in The ethics of researching war
Ahmad H. Sa’di

establishing a better state of affairs. But how can those who reject exceptionalism and its false promise impose it themselves? This contradiction has been at the heart of the Israeli leadership’s discussions on the aesthetics of 04_Ahmad_Ch-3.indd 64 10/12/2013 8:41:42 AM MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 10/12/2013, SPi legal framework, institutions and approaches to power 65 power; namely, how can the representation of the exception conceal its nature? Before 1948, Zionist politicians, lawyers and jurists condemned the Mandatory emergency regulations in the strongest

in Thorough surveillance
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

say, it is a challenge to the object and the object’s defiance of that challenge. Where that confrontation is ignored, there can only be escape into technology or aesthetics – that is to say, into the most facile of solutions.’10 The priest defies this rendering. He defies all rendering. In Baudrillard’s formulation: there is a kind of symbolic murder in the photographic act. But the object isn’t the only thing that disappears; the subject also disappears on the other side of the lens. Every press on the shutter release, which puts an end to the real presence of the

in The ethics of researching war
Abstract only
Elizabeth Dauphinée

particular cry – that binds me to the neighbour who has uttered the cry is taking place even as I formulate these sentences, even as you read them. The call for justice moves between time and being, between mimesis and aesthetics, between Self and Other, between truth and fiction, between scholarship and rumour, and between the possible and the impossible. The suspension of time as telos and trajectory – the opening up of time as an immediacy, which is its corresponding urgency – provides the framework of engagement with the Other because it retains the urgency of the need

in The ethics of researching war