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Elisabeth Salter

gives quite a lot of space to description of contents, narrative and modes of making meaning, whilst using this evidence to interpret reader experience. Following a consideration of some of the critical background to the broader genre of moral tales and exempla, I describe the texts in which Gesta tales survive, focusing on the English versions. I then go on to discuss the aesthetics of the page in these texts with particular reference to Wynkyn de Worde’s addition of illustrations in his printed version of Salter, Popular reading in English.indd 94 21/05/2012 10

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
Susan M. Johns

discussion will consider the importance of beauty in selected texts to consider how it was portrayed and its meanings and to analyse how it was used by authors to authorise agency and power. As I have argued elsewhere, it is generally agreed that the concept of beauty encompassed a complex array of cultural meanings which included ideas about authority and legitimacy. 4 There has been a scholarly discussion about the culturally specific meanings of beauty and its attributes, especially the importance of courtliness and aesthetics, as well as

in Gender, nation and conquest in the high Middle Ages
Elisabeth Salter

in English c. 1400–1600 texts, but also some significant similarities in page layout.158 I use the term ‘aesthetics of the page’ to discuss these similarities of layout. The aesthetics of the page By aesthetics of the page I mean the evidence for what seems to be a prevailing set of rules for the construction or layout of the page, either for a specific text across different versions or because of personal choices made by one scribe. I use this concept in Chapter 4, for example, to examine the use of a similar aesthetic for versions of the same text in the two

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
Abstract only
Husbandry and carving
Elisabeth Salter

layout and the aesthetics Salter, Popular reading in English.indd 138 21/05/2012 10:15:08 Practical texts: husbandry and carving 139 of the page.10 In the final sections of the chapter, I turn to the contents and literary styles of these treatises with particular reference to the Grosseteste and the Fitzherbert, in order to see how these aspects provide more evidence for how practical texts may have been used and read, and by whom. The chapter is of necessity quite detailed as it is concerned with the evidence for reading that these details of similarity and

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
Abstract only
Elisabeth Salter

evidence for reading practice and experience partly because I wish to explore and demonstrate the ample evidence for reading Salter, Popular reading in English.indd 228 21/05/2012 10:15:13 Conclusion 229 within the texts themselves. In Chapter 4, however, I explore the ways that ‘non-meaningful’ annotations in a manuscript compilation of practical texts give some insight into perceptions of the aesthetics of the page as well as providing information about the owners of this book at particular dates and the manuscript’s provenance.12 The use of ‘blank’ pages for a

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
Gawain in a Middle English miscellany
Elisabeth Salter

identification of different hands. I would like to present a slightly different scenario based on my examination of the manuscript, firstly in its digital facsimile and then, to confirm my findings (because ultimately the digital facsimile is one remove too great away from the details of the evidence provided by the real object), using the actual object. My tentative suggestion is that there are fewer scribes at work in Brogyntyn 2.1 than sixteen. I base this on a consideration of ‘production aesthetics’ rather than on style of hand, wishing to suggest that a number of

in Popular reading in English c. 1400–1600
Thomas A. Prendergast and Stephanie Trigg

James’s anatomy of different modalities of time in Globalism, Nationalism, Tribalism , pp. 164–70. 51 Trilling, The Aesthetics of Nostalgia , p. 130. 52 Hanning, The Vision of History in Early Britain , p. 45

in Affective medievalism
Shayne Aaron Legassie

Rebellion:  England in 1381 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994), p. 198. 21 Eamon Duffy demonstrates that pilgrimage vows were taken so seriously that people left behind money in their wills so that others could complete the vow in their place in the event that they died before being able to do so: see The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England, 1400–1580 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992), pp. 194–5. 22 Michel Foucault, ‘Different spaces’, in James D.  Faubion (ed.), Aesthetics, Method, and Epistemology, trans. Robert Hurley et  al

in Roadworks
Eva von Contzen

, perspective and point of view as well as time and space. Such a comprehensive approach to the narrative design of medieval saints’ legends means that we will enter unknown territory. While the features just mentioned are obviously not only relevant for the stories in the Scottish Legendary, the specifics of hagiographic narration call for a careful handling of the parameters and theoretical terminology we apply. As Theodor Wolpers has remarked, late medieval hagiography cannot be adequately described by the terminology and means of conventional literary aesthetics but

in The Scottish Legendary
Dylan Foster Evans

considered the aesthetics of roads, noting that every new road is an unpleasant sight before Nature’s hand can hide the worst of the scarring.108 For Jenkins, though, the roads were overwhelmingly a force for good: a road’s work was to ‘bring the regions of Wales closer together, and to make us all better Welsh people as we are now able to know every corner of our country’.109 Jenkins’s claim that roads have long played a part in nation building (as opposed to merely integrating Wales ever more closely with England) has a relevance to medieval Wales. Traditionally, this

in Roadworks