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’, MG , 29 June 1914, p. 11. 9 ‘An Interruption by Suffragettes’, MG , 20 July 1914, p. 11. 10 ‘At the Cathedral: Crowded Congregation Offers Supplication’, MG , 8 August 1914, p. 10. 11 Peter Green, The Problem of Art: A Text-Book of Aesthetics (London: Longmans, 1937), p. 166. 12 ‘Manchester and the War: More Belgians come to the Port of Refuge’, MG , 13 October 1914, p. 8

in Manchester Cathedral

Edward Lee Hicks photographed when Bishop of Ely, c . 1916 In the Cathedral, Maclure’s approach to services was in effect to preserve the status quo ante on his appointment, which pre-empted charges of ritual innovation but also entailed no significant retreat from former practice. This was too conservative for those like Boutflower who would have preferred a more elaborate ritual. 126 But even Boutflower conceded that Maclure was ‘very fond of æsthetics, and had a great

in Manchester Cathedral
Kinship, community and identity
Author:

Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries are well-known because of their rich grave goods, but this wealth can obscure their importance as local phenomena and the product of pluralistic multi-generational communities. This book explores over one hundred early Anglo-Saxon and some Merovingian cemeteries and aims to understand them using a multi-dimensional methodology. The performance of mortuary drama was a physical communication and so needed syntax and semantics. This local knowledge was used to negotiate the arrangement of cemetery spaces and to construct the stories that were told within them. For some families the emphasis of a mortuary ritual was on reinforcing and reproducing family narratives, but this was only one technique used to arrange cemetery space. This book offers an alternative way to explore the horizontal organisation of cemeteries from a holistic perspective. Each chapter builds on the last, using visual aesthetics, leitmotifs, spatial statistics, grave orientation, density of burial, mortuary ritual, grave goods, grave robbing, barrows, integral structures, skeletal trauma, stature, gender and age to build a detailed picture of complex mortuary spaces. This approach places community at the forefront of interpretation because people used and reused cemetery spaces and these people chose to emphasise different characteristics of the deceased because of their own attitudes, lifeways and lived experiences. This book will appeal to scholars of Anglo-Saxon studies and will also be of value to archaeologists interested in mortuary spaces, communities and social differentiation because it proposes a way to move beyond grave goods in the discussion of complex social identities.

Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

bury themselves’ (Parker Pearson, 1993 : 203; 1999 : 3), because the decisions and attitudes which contributed to the aesthetics of display and the expression of the deceased’s identity were selected by a unique mortuary party within a historically contingent event. The mortuary events were knitted together by a group of people who had been fragmented following the death of one of their members (Metcalf and Huntington, 1991 ). The decisions that this community made dictated the mode of burial – cremation or inhumation – and the location of the grave within a

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Duncan Sayer

Chapter 1, ‘Negotiating early Anglo-Saxon cemetery space’, provides an introduction to the subject by describing how archaeologists have approached early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries. It uses this historiography as a foundation upon which to describe several cemetery sites, starting with a double burial from Oakington and then focusing on the description of two complete cemeteries at Orpington, Kent and Apple Down, West Sussex. This chapter illustrates the problem with traditional monothematic approaches and describes how spatial layout, material culture and skeletal characteristics can be used together to explore the social arena. It also defines the philosophy that underpins the book. Based on interdisciplinary perspectives, Chapter 1 explores the causal agency embedded in relationships, material expressions of identity, transformative objects and aesthetic selection. Artefacts exist within the social world, and so the sociology of shoes and modern-day gravegoods are useful examples which are analogous to how more ancient objects interfaced with people. Society is pluralistic, but its physical remains are created from an amalgam of factors, including the manifestation of identities and aesthetics derived from shared semiotic knowledge.

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

context of your upbringing. In this case then there are in fact multiple societal attitudes towards gender or the family, just as people’s experience of family varies widely. This book uses a comprehensive exploration of the early Anglo-Saxon mortuary context to drill down into the local history and development of cemetery sites to explore the role of family and household and their impact on localised expressions of gender, life course and wealth. This exploration is a case study in mortuary archaeology which proposes a way of looking at the visual aesthetics of

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Abstract only
John Lever
and
Johan Fischer

power and socioeconomic organisation (Mennell 1985). While our empirical material from the UK and Denmark highlights the ways in which ‘food piety’ is practised in everyday life, it also illustrates how kosher and halal reflect a type of cultural consumption that is inseparable from aesthetics and everyday life (Warde 2016). Celebrations, religious festivals and ‘eating out’ are now more complex for kosher and halal consumers for a whole range of reasons, with strategies and forward planning thus becoming more important in a minority religious context. Warde’s (2016

in Religion, regulation, consumption
Christian Suhr

proper to them is, of course, merely a tribute to orthodox formal logic … [d]isplacing the expressiveness of archaic disproportion for regulated “stone tables” of officially decreed harmony’ (Eisenstein 1949 : 34–5). By contrast, the cinema of montage implied an aesthetics where each juxtaposition of film shots constituted a qualitative leap out of the perceptual regimes that dominate human action and thought (see also Deleuze 2005a [1986]: 38). Instead of the correspondence model of observational cinema, the filmmaking pursued by early

in Descending with angels
Abstract only
Christian Suhr

discussion with Said, a young Somali university student. In response to my regret about feeling unable to read the Quran, finding it too difficult and complex, Said referred me to a YouTube lecture about the ‘Literary Characteristics of the Quran’ by Nouman Ali Khan ( 2009 ). Here the divine speech was made sense of by attributing to it the aesthetics of the modern medium of film. Hirschkind ( 2006 : 155) performs a similar operation in an analysis of the cinematic qualities in Islamic cassette sermons in Cairo. One way of understanding this coupling between a modern

in Descending with angels
Rebecca Whiteley

early modern life cycle, and the role that print culture played in making it. Notes 1 Rebecca Zorach, ‘“A secret kind of charm not to be expressed or discerned”: on Claude Mellan’s insinuating lines’, RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics , 55/56 ( 2009 ), 235; John Evelyn, Sculptura: Or the History, and Art of Chalcography and Engraving in Copper, with an Ample Enumeration of the Most Renowned Masters, and Their Works (London: G. Beedle and

in Religion and life cycles in early modern England