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Pathologising security through Lacanian desire
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

discourse, but memorial aesthetics incorporate citizens into an idea of a resilient, immortal system of population. They are resituated with regard to immortality and death. Of particular relevance to the Lacanian theory of security postulated here, Chapter 3 looked at the shift towards the open representation of death and absence in memorial design. Rather than the stone

in Death and security
Memory and security without visibility
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

Memorialisation is a technique that utilises visibility to re-narrate an event and, as argued here, to re-take place from the incursion of mortality. As Lewis Mumford argued in The Culture of Cities , the impenetrable and eternal aesthetics of memorial stones, plinths and pillars convey a ‘deceptive assurance of life’ (Mumford 1938 : 434). This book has explored the

in Death and security
Norwegian experiences of death and security
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

reclaimed through practices that happen at post-terrorist sites. This is clearly a very different approach from the manipulation of images of absence, as utilised within Memory Wound or Reflecting Absence . This chapter explores the functionality of ‘place’ within civil society approaches to post-terrorist space, arguing that despite the differing aesthetics from postmodern

in Death and security
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Disaster recovery and the World Trade Center
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

(which seeks to touch the event that disrupted the symbolic order) before re-narrating the moment of horror and death within a story of resilient life. The survivor trees In the aesthetics of postmodern memorial architecture (Blair et al . 1991 ), design runs against statist desires to conceal and mitigate mortality. The abandonment of the traditional memorial form has led to a

in Death and security
Itinerant death at the Ground Zero Mosque and Bali bombsite
Charlotte Heath-Kelly

Islam with a ‘global threat’ and opposed the Park 51 building on the grounds of ‘security’ rather than identity or aesthetics (Duer 2012 : 95–9). While some of these political opinions might be more associated with fringe groups, the discourse of spatial proximity to Ground Zero penetrated the mainstream consciousness and international debate. It is these spatial dynamics that

in Death and security
Relief, reconstruction and disputes over civilian suffering in the Anglo-Boer War, 1899–1902
Rebecca Gill

Briton after her own pattern: values of trust, co-operation and the nobility of labour were to be revived with each yard of arduously spun cloth. Hand-crafted textiles met a desire for a South African cultural ‘heritage’ able to reconcile a sense of old European aesthetics and new colonial nationalist aspirations. On these grounds she made an appeal for funds ‘to all who value a

in Calculating compassion
British relief in the Franco-Prussian War, 1870–71
Rebecca Gill

. 75 J. Buzard, The Beaten Track: European Tourism, Literature and the Ways to Culture, 1800–1918 , Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1993; Malcolm Andrews, The Search for the Picturesque: Landscape Aesthetics and Tourism in Britain, 1760–1800 , Scholar Press, Aldershot, 1989. For a particularly influential contemporary

in Calculating compassion
Teens’ perceptions and experiences of peace walls, flags and murals
Madeleine Leonard

disguise their potentially negative presence. Gormley-Heenan et al. ( 2013 : 363) argue that as long ago as the 1980s attempts were made to make the walls look more ‘aesthetically pleasing’ and less militaristic. A report for the Northern Ireland Assembly (Jarman, 2002 : 2) notes the ‘transformation in the aesthetics of peaceline construction which has seen a shift from grey steel fences to multi-toned brick walls

in Teens and territory in ‘post-conflict’ Belfast
Dialogue as normative grounds and object of critique
Naomi Head

live their lives in concrete situations. 59 The ‘good’ refers to subjective and identity-forming issues such as aesthetics, tastes, and preferences. For Habermas, the ‘good’ lays out a sphere of autonomy where individuals cannot be told how to live or what to believe. The ‘moral’ however, is based on normative claims of rightness. It deals with ‘ moral questions, which can in

in Justifying violence
Naomi Head

the former, developed as part of Kant’s work on aesthetics, looks for the universal within the particular and demands that we think for ourselves. Arendt’s interpretation and use of reflective judgement diverges from Kant’s own. Kant’s restriction of judgement to the aesthetic sphere was insufficient for Arendt who saw judgement as relevant to political action because she

in Justifying violence