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Matthew Steele

Relics Baths – Matthew Steele Ever since the Romans established the spa town of Aquae Sulis (later, the city of Bath) in ad 60, there has been a preoccupation with public bathing in Britain. In the early period of public bathing in the eighteenth century, the emphasis was on the reputed restorative powers of natural springs, and was a leisure activity mostly pursued by the gentry and aristocracy. However, the passing of the 1846 Public Baths and Wash-houses Act, which allowed local authorities to raise funds for the construction of municipally run facilities

in Manchester
Regeneration meets the Private Finance Initiative
Stuart Hodkinson

provides an overview of the 20 public housing PFI regeneration schemes operational in England SAH.indb 56 30/01/2019 12:44:50 Regeneration meets the Private Finance Initiative 57 as of 2018, and introduces the three London local authority case studies which form the evidence base of the book: Islington’s street properties, Camden’s Chalcots Estate and Lambeth’s MFN estate. The fourth section reveals the controversy on the ground that met the undemocratic imposition of many housing PFI schemes – sometimes in the face of resident opposition – and the problems that

in Safe as houses
Abstract only
Matthew Steele

garden and set around open recreational space. Other private enterprises followed, including those at Fairfield (1906), Hollins Green (1908), Alkrington (1909) and Chorltonville (1911), before the passing of the 1919 Housing Act which, through the promise of government subsidies, encouraged municipal authorities, including Manchester Corporation, to follow suit. In keeping with the recommendations of the Tudor Walters Report (1918), the Act stated that new municipal housing was to be built at a density of no more than twelve to the acre and, preferably, on undeveloped

in Manchester
Stuart Hodkinson

. Different parties who might be considered to embody or defend the public interest – residents, elected politicians, courts, regulators and safety authorities – are not able to exercise democratic scrutiny over the decisions and actions taken by the public and private sector partners. I will show that accountability has been specifically designed out of outsourced delivery in three main ways: first, through an extreme form of self-regulation in which the public authority has very little oversight over private sector compliance with the required contractual standards and

in Safe as houses
Open Access (free)
Learning from communities in informal settlements in Durban, South Africa
Maria Christina Georgiadou
and
Claudia Loggia

been successful to date. By contrast, participatory techniques in the design and construction of housing have been used to enhance community empowerment and a sense of local ownership. However, participation and collaboration can mean various things for informal housing upgrading, and often the involvement of local communities is limited to providing feedback in already agreed development decisions from local authorities and construction companies. This research lies under the umbrella of sustainable bottom-up urban regeneration. As part of a

in African cities and collaborative futures
A genealogical enquiry
Małgorzata Jakimów

, 2010 : 91). The central government introduced the reform in reaction to the public outrage at the beating to death of Sun Zhigang, a university-educated migrant detained by police in Guangzhou in 2003 for not carrying ID with him. This development should also be regarded as an example of the potential of society to transform laws governing some aspects of citizenship status (Hand, 2006 ). However, the reforms were short-lived as the rise in the homeless and begging population in the city centres of Shanghai and Beijing prompted the authorities to revise the policy

in China’s citizenship challenge
Abstract only
Private greed, political negligence and housing policy after Grenfell

As the tragedy of the Grenfell Tower fire of 14 June 2017 has slowly revealed a shadowy background of outsourcing and deregulation, and a council turning a blind eye to health and safety concerns, many questions need answers. Stuart Hodkinson has those answers. Safe as Houses weaves together Stuart’s research over the last decade with residents’ groups in council regeneration projects across London to provide the first comprehensive account of how Grenfell happened and how it could easily have happened in multiple locations across the country. It draws on examples of unsafe housing either refurbished or built by private companies under the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) to show both the terrible human consequences of outsourcing and deregulation and how the PFI has enabled developers, banks and investors to profiteer from highly lucrative, taxpayer-funded contracts. The book also provides shocking testimonies of how councils and other public bodies have continuously sided with their private partners, doing everything in their power to ignore, deflect and even silence those who speak out. The book concludes that the only way to end the era of unsafe regeneration and housing provision is to end the disastrous regime of self-regulation. This means strengthening safety laws, creating new enforcement agencies independent of government and industry, and replacing PFI and similar models of outsourcing with a new model of public housing that treats the provision of shelter as ‘a social service’ democratically accountable to its residents.

Abstract only
Matthew Steele

Bradford, an area to the east of Manchester’s city centre, has undergone, and continues to undergo, significant change. Once open pasture, industrialisation throughout the nineteenth century saw factories and mills joined by workers’ housing and associated amenities, such as public houses and places of worship. However, with the decline of industry in the twentieth century and the displacement of Bradford’s residents as municipal authorities enacted comprehensive redevelopment schemes in the post-1945 period, many of those amenities became redundant. This chapter considers whether the relocation of Manchester City Football Club from Moss Side to Bradford offers hope that some of the area’s remaining historic buildings can be repurposed.

in Manchester
Pragmatism between rationalism and sentimentality 
Robert W. Lake

This chapter concludes the edited collection published as The power of pragmatism. It takes us back to the ‘quest for certainty’ in knowledge production with which we opened the volume. The chapter makes the case for adopting a pragmatic orientation to embrace uncertainty as both unavoidable and potentially productive. Recognising the seductive temptations of certainty that appear to provide order, progress, authority and respect, the chapter advocates the a priori acceptance of contingency as an antidote to dogmatism. This requires a sceptical orientation towards all statements of truth and a very different approach to knowledge production. The contributors to this volume advance and illustrate the power of pragmatism as a mode of knowledge production in the social sciences.

in The power of pragmatism

This book explores contemporary urban experiences connected to practices of sharing and collaboration. Part of a growing discussion on the cultural meaning and the politics of urban commons, it uses examples from Europe and Latin America to support the view that a world of mutual support and urban solidarity is emerging today in, against, and beyond existing societies of inequality. In such a world, people experience the potentialities of emancipation activated by concrete forms of space commoning. By focusing on concrete collective experiences of urban space appropriation and participatory design experiments this book traces differing, but potentially compatible, trajectories through which common space (or space-as-commons) becomes an important factor in social change. In the everydayness of self-organized neighborhoods, in the struggles for justice in occupied public spaces, in the emergence of “territories in resistance,” and in dissident artistic practices of collaborative creation, collective inventiveness produces fragments of an emancipated society.